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A Very Cultural Weekend: European Heritage Days

What are the most prominent cultural facets of your country? How do you commemorate or celebrate them, if at all?

In France, the European Heritage Days are a manifestation nationale (“national event”) set aside for exploring French culture and history. From free wine tastings and tours to elaborate music festivals, there’s an experience for everyone! 

In this article, you’ll learn all about European Heritage Days and pick up some useful vocabulary. Let’s get started!

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1. What are the European Heritage Days?

miniature French flags hung on a line near a lamp post for European Heritage Days

European Heritage Days, (also called European Heritage “Open” Days), are an annuelle (“annual”) celebration of the unique heritage each European country possesses. The Ministère de la Culture Française (“French Ministry of Cultural Affairs”) launched this celebration in 1984 at the initiative of Minister Jack Lang, and many other European countries soon followed suit. Today, under the Council of Europe and European Commission, every state in the European Cultural Convention celebrates a form of Heritage Day. 

Still, perhaps no European country has a more substantial celebration as France. At the time of this writing, there are forty-two UNESCO World Heritage sites in France alone, and over 400,000 protected monuments and sites. Add to that the country’s intensive history, magnificent foods and wines unmatched the world over, and the lovely French language. It should come as no surprise that this holiday has met with such success, drawing in millions of tourists each year. 

To keep the excitement alive, the European Heritage Days Assembly announces a special theme for the holiday each year. In 2020, the theme is going to be “Heritage and Education.”

2. The Date of EHD Every Year

The European Heritage Days begin during the third weekend of September. For your convenience, following is a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

  • 2020: September 19 to September 20
  • 2021: September 18 to September 19
  • 2022: September 17 to September 18
  • 2023: September 16 to September 17
  • 2024: September 21 to September 22
  • 2025: September 20 to September 21
  • 2026: September 19 to September 20
  • 2027: September 18 to September 19
  • 2028: September 16 to September 17
  • 2029: September 15 to September 16

3. Traditions & Celebrations for European Heritage Days

a child looking at paintings in a museum

France is crowded for European Heritage Days, especially in areas that are already significant tourist hotspots (a.k.a. Paris).

This is because museums and certain historical sites that are typically closed year-round are open to the public over the weekend to promote cultural education. European Heritage Days in Paris means gratuit (“free”) entry into a number of major sites—an opportunity you can’t miss! 

Schools often take advantage of this holiday to educate their students on the cultural marvels of France. Museums host free European Heritage Days tours for school groups on the Friday prior, giving students and teachers the opportunity to explore and learn without the hassle of large crowds.

For European Heritage Days, Paris also provides an array of culture-oriented workshops and guided tours for the general public. Examples include a stroll through a cemetery, a walk-and-talk with a major academic, and the chance to win prizes and exclusive tours! 

    → See our list of the Top 10 Weekend Activities to learn how else the French might spend the weekend (because who likes crowds?). 

4. Visiting? Here are Some Must-See Places.

a tourist taking a photograph

There are a couple of places we highly recommend you visit if you’ll be in France for the holiday weekend.

Bercy Village

Bercy Village is known for its old-fashioned charm, combined with its penchant for modern architecture. 

In Bercy Village, European Heritage Days are the perfect chance to explore the green fields of Bercy Park, the Ministère de l’économie de l’industrie et de l’emploi (open exclusively for this weekend), and the gorgeous cafes and outdoor shopping stalls. 

In 2020, Bercy Village will also have a unique flower presentation all summer long, ending in mid-October. 

Bordeaux 

During the European Heritage Days, Bordeaux is the place to go to watch grape-harvesting ceremonies, attend music festivals, and sip on wine while taking night tours of a castle. (Yes, you read that right.)

You can read more about what to expect in Bordeaux here, and learn The Top Tourist Attractions in France with FrenchPod101.com. 

5. Essential EHD Vocabulary

French Ministry of Cultural Affairs

Let’s review some of the vocabulary words and phrases from this article: 

  • Museum – Musée [noun, masculine]
  • Country – Pays [noun, masculine]
  • National event – Manifestation nationale
  • Annual – Annuelle [adjective]
  • Fifty – Cinquante [adjective, masculine]
  • Open day – Journée portes ouvertes [feminine]
  • Historical monument – Monument historique [masculine]
  • French Ministry of Cultural Affairs – Ministère de la Culture Française [masculine]
  • End of August – Fin août [feminine]
  • Beginning of November – Début novembre [masculine]
  • Free – Gratuit [adjective]

Remember that you can hear the pronunciation of each word on our French European Heritage Days vocabulary list! 

Final Thoughts

What do you say? Are wine tastings, flowers in the sky, and free museum entry enough to convince you to visit France? Let us know in the comments!

Before you head out, though, you’ll need to have some basic French knowledge:

To learn even more about French culture and holidays, see the following blog posts on FrenchPod101.com, or visit the archive:

We hope to see you around!

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100 Must-Know French Verbs

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Did you get the chance to read our previous articles on 100 Nouns and 100 Adjectives? In that case, I guess you saw this one coming! To complete your French arsenal, I present you with the most common and useful French verbs. 

They’ll greatly expand your capacity to build interesting phrases, as well as enhance your reading and listening skills. More importantly, they’ll get you through most of your daily interactions and you’re not likely to be caught off-guard once you’ve mastered them.
In this article, we’ll cover everything from French verb conjugation—including -er and -ir verbs—reflexive verbs, and of course, a list of the top 100 verbs for you to add to your vocabulary.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Useful Verbs in French Table of Contents
  1. Mastering French Verbs
  2. The 100 Most Useful French Verbs
  3. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French

1. Mastering French Verbs

Je visite Paris - Tu visites Paris - Il visite Paris

1- French Tenses are Scary

If you know a bit about French verb conjugation, you know it can be intimidating, with many groups, tenses, and exceptions. However, once you start understanding the logic underneath, you’ll soon brush this first impression off.

Of course, coming from the English language, even the Présent tense can seem a bit overwhelming, with distinct endings for each pronoun:

  • Je pense
  • Tu penses
  • Il / Elle pense
  • Nous pensons
  • Vous pensez
  • Ils pensent

This is not an article about tenses, and we’ll stick to the Présent for most of the examples, with occasional notes on the Passé composé (one of the three most common tenses in spoken French, alongside Present and Near Future).

And for all your conjugation needs, I suggest that you bookmark this website (or any similar online resource): https://la-conjugaison.nouvelobs.com/. Also keep in mind that FrenchPod101 will soon have another article dedicated to French verb conjugation rules! 

2- The Curse of Irregular Verbs

One important thing to keep in mind is that, like in most languages, the most prominent verbs are also the most irregular ones. People have been using these verbs so much over the centuries that they had plenty of opportunities to evolve, mutate, and twist in mysterious ways, to the point where some of their conjugated forms differ wildly from the infinitive. 

You shouldn’t be put off by the first verbs you’ll learn, such as être (“to be”) or aller (“to go”). Just like in English, these verbs are highly irregular. But I still recommend that you learn them first, as they’re also some of the absolute most useful French verbs you’ll encounter.

3- The Bliss of Regular Verbs

Top Verbs

In the meantime, many other verbs will show similarities, and from them, you’ll get a grasp of how regular verbs work. 

Understanding regular French verbs early on will allow you to navigate through this list with much more ease, so here’s everything there is to know about conjugating French verbs:

Penser (“to think”) ← This is the infinitive form

Pens ← This is the “stem”

1st sg (I)2nd sg (you)3rd sg (she)1st pl (we)2nd pl (you)3rd pl (they)
Stem + eStem + esStem + eStem + onsStem + ezStem + ent
Je penseTu pensesElle penseNous pensonsVous pensezIls pensent

4- Should You Care About Verb Groups?

Short answer: No.

Oh well, let me elaborate a little. It’s very common when learning French verbs to start with a lesson on verb groups. There are three groups based on verb endings:

  • French ER verbs
  • French IR verbs
  • French RE verbs

Each of these groups follows a given set of rules that you can use as guidelines to conjugate virtually any French verb. Pretty cool, right? Except it doesn’t work.

The first group is somewhat regular…let’s say for the most part. Then, the other two groups are such a giant mess of irregularities that it doesn’t make sense to try and rely on groups at all. You’ll see that many of the IR and RE verbs from this very list don’t abide by any fixed set of rules. For that reason, I won’t talk about it any further.

French Kid Trying to Make Sense of Verb Groups.

5- How to Effectively Learn French Verbs

Understanding French verbs in their entirety may seem like an impossible task, and you’re probably wondering how to memorize French verbs easily and effectively. 

To quickly pick up on French verbs and conjugation, I recommend jumping right into it! Don’t clutter your memory with countless rules and conjugation tables. Instead, read the examples from this article’s verbs list and try to figure out for yourself the inner workings of their conjugation. Here are some questions to get you started:

  • How does the infinitive end?
  • How does it end now that it’s conjugated with this pronoun?
  • Is it working like similar verbs I’ve seen before or could it be irregular?

The more you figure out by yourself, the more confident you’ll become with verbs and the quicker you’ll be able to handle them without overthinking it and dwelling on textbook rules. Only then can you consider reviewing what you’ve learned with some more academic material and get a better idea of the big picture.

Now, let’s review our French verbs list for beginners! 

2. The 100 Most Useful French Verbs

More Essential Verbs

These are French verbs used in daily life that you’ll hear over and over again in France. What are you waiting for? Get cracking!

1

être
“to be”
Je suis Français.
“I am French.”

2

avoir
“to have”
Tu as une maison à Paris.
“You have a house in Paris.”

Être and avoir are auxiliary verbs, which makes them the two most important French verbs. We use them to form compound conjugations in tenses such as passé composé and past subjunctive.

Here’s an example of passé composé with the verb manger (“to eat”):

  • Présent: Je mange (“I eat”)
  • Passé composé: J’ai mangé (“I have eaten”)

Here’s another example with the verb tomber (“to fall”):

  • Présent: Je tombe (“I fall”)
  • Passé composé: Je suis tombé (“I have fallen”)
/! When should I use the French auxiliary verbs être or avoir?

We use avoir in most situations, except for these two cases:

1) We use être for all pronominal verbs (those starting with se)

For example: se lever (“to stand up”)
  • Présent: Je me lève (“I stand up”)
  • Passé composé: Je me suis levé (“I have stood up”)
2) We also use être for a few other verbs, most of them reflecting a change of direction, state, or movement.

Some examples: monter, rester, retourner, descendre, passer, venir, aller, entrer, sortir, arriver, partir, tomber
French Irregular Verbs - Volumes 1 to 24

Now that our auxiliaries are under control, let’s get back to our list!

3

aller
“to go”
Vous allez à l’école le lundi.
“You go to school on Mondays.”
Aller is used to form one of the most important tenses of spoken French: Near Future.
  • Tu vas voir ! (“You will see!”)
  • Ils vont s’amuser. (“They will have fun.”)

4

vouloir
“to want,” “to wish”
Vous voulez du café ?
“Do you want some coffee?”

5

pouvoir
“can,” “to be able”
Il peut venir ce soir.
“He can come tonight.”

6

devoir
“must,” “to have to,” “to owe”
Nous devons y aller.
“We need to go.”
Devoir is also a noun, meaning “duty.”

7

falloir
“to have to”
Il faut le voir pour le croire.
“You have to see it to believe it.”

8

faire
“to do,” “to make”
Ils font la paix.
“They are making peace.”

9

dire
“to tell,” “to say”
Tu dis ce que tu penses.
“You say what you think.”

10

parler
“to speak”
Nous parlons souvent.
“We speak often.”

11

aimer
“to like,” “to love”
J’aime le fromage.
“I love cheese.”
It’s interesting to notice that “to like” and “to love” translate into the same French verb.

So, when I say: J’aime ma femme (“I love my wife”) and J’aime le fromage (“I love cheese”), it conveys a similar intensity.

Not so romantic now, are we?

12

mettre
“to put,” “to place”
Je mets le rôti au four.
“I put the roast in the oven.”

13

remettre
“to put back”
Tu remets ton chapeau.
“You’re putting your hat back.”

14

poser
“to put down,” “to ask”
Il pose son sac dans la chambre.
“He’s putting his bag in the bedroom.”

Elle pose trop de questions.
“She’s asking too many questions.”

15

prendre
“to take,” “to catch,” “to capture”
Il prend le bus tous les jours.
“He takes the bus everyday.”

16

donner
“to give”
Nous donnerons bientôt notre réponse.
“We will give our answer shortly.”

17

savoir
“to know”
Je ne sais pas.
“I don’t know.”

18

voir
“to see”
Les chats voient dans le noir.
“Cats can see in the dark.”

19

entendre
“to hear”
Ils ont entendu un bruit.
“They have heard a noise.”

20

demander
“to ask,” “to request”
Tu as demandé l’addition ?
“Did you ask for the check?”

21

répondre
“to answer,” “to reply”
Il répond à un email.
“He’s answering an email.”

22

chercher
“to look for”
Nous cherchons un appartement.
“We are looking for a flat.”

23

trouver
“to find,” “to discover”
Il trouve toujours une solution.
“He always finds a solution.”

24

retrouver
“to regain,” “to meet up”
On se retrouve devant la gare.
“We’re meeting in front of the train station.”

25

rendre
“to return,” “to give back,” “to make”
Tu vas rendre cet argent.
“You will give this money back.”

26

venir
“to come”
Nous venons en paix.
“We come in peace.”

27

passer
“to pass,” “to go,” “to come”
Il est passé par ici.
“He came this way.”

28

croire
“to believe,” “to think”
Je crois qu’il est là.
“I think he’s here.”

29

montrer
“to show”
Montrez-moi vos mains.
“Show me your hands.”

30

commencer
“to begin,” “to start”
Le film commence maintenant.
“The movie is starting now.”

31

continuer
“to continue,” “to keep going”
Continuez tout droit.
“Keep going straight.”

32

penser
“to think”
Je ne pense pas.
“I don’t think so.”

33

comprendre
“to understand,” “to include,” “to comprehend”
Ils ne comprennent rien.
“They don’t understand anything.”

34

rester
“to stay,” “to remain”
Restez calme.
“Remain calm.”

35

attendre
“to wait”
J’attends mon bus.
“I’m waiting for my bus.”

36

partir
“to leave”
Tu pars demain ?
“Are you leaving tomorrow?”

37

arriver
“to arrive,” “to happen”
Il est arrivé en retard.
“He arrived late.”

Ça arrive tous les jours.
“It happens everyday.”

38

suivre
“to follow”
Suivez cette voiture !
“Follow this car!”

39

revenir
“to come back”
Nous revenons de vacances.
“We are coming back from vacation.”

40

connaître
“to know”
Ils connaissent ce restaurant.
“They know this restaurant.”

41

compter
“to count”
Je vais compter jusqu’à 10.
“I will count to 10.”

42

permettre
“to permit,” “to allow”
Ils nous permettent d’entrer.
“They allow us to enter.”
French idiom time!
  • Tu permets ? (“Do you mind?”) [Casual]
  • Vous permettez ? (“Would you mind?”) [Polite]

43

s’occuper
“to take care of”
Il s’occupe des enfants.
“He’s taking care of the kids.”

44

sembler
“to seem”
Cela semble certain.
“It seems certain.”

45

lire
“to read”
Elle lit le journal.
“She’s reading the newspapers.”
Mother and Son Reading Books

Nous lisons un livre. (“We are reading a book.”)

46

écrire
“to write”
Nous écrivons sur un blog.
“We are writing on a blog.”

47

devenir
“to become,” “to turn into”
Je veux devenir pilote.
“I want to become a pilot.”

48

décider
“to decide”
Vous avez décidé de venir ?
“Did you decide to come?”

49

tenir
“to hold”
Je te tiendrai la main.
“I will hold your hand.”

50

porter
“to carry,” “to wear”
Il est interdit de porter des bretelles.
“It is forbidden to wear suspenders.”

51

servir
“to serve”
Ils servent de la soupe.
“They are serving soup.”

52

laisser
“to leave,” “to allow,” “to let”
Laissez-moi tranquille !
“Leave me alone!”

53

envoyer
“to send”
Ils vont l’envoyer par la poste.
“They will send it by mail.”

54

recevoir
“to receive”
Elle ne l’a pas encore reçu.
“She didn’t receive it yet.”

55

vivre
“to live”
Nous vivons en Russie.
“We live in Russia.”

56

appeler
“to call”
Je t’appelle plus tard.
“I’ll call you later.”

57

rappeler
“to remind,” “to call back”
Je te rappelle dans un moment.
“I’ll call you back in a moment.”

58

présenter
“to introduce,” “to present”
Je te présenterai ma fiancée.
“I’ll introduce you to my fiancée.”

59

accepter
“to accept”
Nous acceptons Visa et Mastercard.
“We accept Visa and Mastercard.”

60

refuser
“to refuse”
Il a refusé de travailler là.
“He refused to work there.”

61

agir
“to act”
Tu agis bizarrement.
“You’re acting weird.”

62

jouer
“to play”
Vous jouez à quoi ?
“What are you playing?”

63

reconnaître
“to recognize,” “to acknowledge”
Je ne l’avais pas reconnue.
“I didn’t recognize her.”

64

choisir
“to choose,” “to select”
Choisis bien !
“Choose well!”

65

toucher
“to touch”
Je peux toucher ?
“Can I touch?”

66

expliquer
“to explain”
Expliquez moi comment y aller.
“Explain to me how to go there.”

67

Se lever
“to stand up,” “to get out of bed”
Je me lève tous les jours à 8h.
“I get out of bed everyday at 8 o’clock.”

68

ouvrir
“to open”
Il ouvre son cadeau.
“He’s opening his present.”

69

gagner
“to win,” “to earn”
On a gagné !
“We won!”

70

perdre
“to lose”
Tu perds la tête.
“You’re losing your mind.”

71

exister
“to exist”
Ça existe encore ?
“Does it still exist?”

72

réussir
“to succeed,” “to manage”
J’ai réussi à le réparer.
“I managed to fix it.”

73

changer
“to change”
Il va changer de coiffure.
“He will change his haircut.”

74

travailler
“to work”
Nous travaillons dans l’informatique.
“We work in IT.”

75

dormir
“to sleep”
Elle dort sur le canapé.
“She’s sleeping on the couch.”

76

marcher
“to walk”
Ils marchent très rapidement.
“They walk really fast.”
Negative Verbs

77

essayer
“to try,” “to attempt”
J’essaye une nouvelle technique.
“I’m trying a new technique.”

78

empêcher
“to prevent,” “to stop”
Ca ne t’empêche pas d’essayer.
“It doesn’t stop you from trying.”

79

reprendre
“to resume,” “to take back”
Il reprend sa partie.
“He’s resuming his game.”

80

cuisiner
“to cook”
Vous cuisinez du cassoulet.
“You’re cooking cassoulet.”

81

appartenir
“to belong”
Cette maison appartient à ma famille.
“This house belongs to my family.”

82

risquer
“to risk”
Il risque sa vie tous les jours.
“He’s risking his life everyday.”

83

apprendre
“to learn,” “to teach”
Vous apprenez le Français sur FrenchPod101.
“You’re learning French on FrenchPod101.”

84

rencontrer
“to meet”
On s’est rencontrés sur Internet.
“We met on the Internet.”

85

créer
“to create”
Les écrivains créent des mondes imaginaires.
“Writers create imaginary worlds.”

86

obtenir
“to obtain,” “to get”
Il a obtenu son diplôme.
“He got his degree.”

87

entrer
“to enter”
Elle entre par la porte de derrière.
“She’s entering through the back door.”

88

sortir
“to exit,” “to go out,” “to leave”
Tu sors, ce soir ?
“Are you going out tonight?”

89

proposer
“to offer,” “to suggest”
Nous vous offrons un poste.
“We offer you a position.”

90

apporter
“to bring”
J’ai apporté du saucisson.
“I’ve brought saucisson.”

91

utiliser
“to use”
On utilise des engrais naturels.
“We use natural fertilizers.”

92

atteindre
“to reach,” “to achieve”
Ça a atteint de nouveaux sommets.
“It has reached new heights.”

93

préparer
“to prepare,” “to make”
Je prépare le déjeuner.
“I’m making lunch.”

94

ajouter
“to add”
Ajoutons un peu de sel.
“Let’s add a bit of salt.”

95

voyager
“to travel”
Je voyage en Europe.
“I travel in Europe.”

96

payer
“to pay”
Avez-vous payé l’addition ?
“Did you pay the check?”

97

vendre
“to sell,” “to distribute”
Je vends mon appareil photo.
“I’m selling my camera.”

98

acheter
“to buy”
Tu achètes un ordinateur.
“You buy a computer.”

99

pousser
“to push”
Nous devons pousser la voiture.
“We have to push the car.”

100

tirer
“to pull,” “to shoot”
Il faut tirer très fort.
“You have to pull real hard.”
Man Pushing the Couch

Il pousse le canapé. (“He’s pushing the couch.”)

3. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French

In this French verbs guide, you’ve learned everything about French verbs, from conjugation to auxiliary, groups, and irregular French verbs. And of course, you now have a wide selection of the most useful French verbs, with examples to get you familiar with them.

Did I forget any important verb that you know? Do you feel ready to put them to work in your daily conversations with French speakers?


FrenchPod101 also has tons of vocabulary lists with audio recordings and free resources to boost your studies and keep your French learning fresh and entertaining!

Remember that you can also use our premium service,  MyTeacher, to get personal one-on-one coaching. Your private teacher can help you practice with verbs and conjugation using assignments, personalized exercises, and recorded audio samples for you. They can also review yours to help improve your pronunciation. Happy learning on FrenchPod101!

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10 Types of French Pronouns to Keep Things Sleek and Smooth

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Do you feel like your French is awkwardly congested with unnecessary repetitions? Wish there was a way to make these go away, and replace them with…let me think…beautiful pronouns? Oh, hey, what a coincidence!

French pronouns are what keep you from repeating the same things over and over when it’s already been mentioned, or when it’s just plain obvious. For example, you wouldn’t call your friends by their names in every single sentence. It’s better to use personal pronouns, such as tu, il, or elle. And this is just the tip of the iceberg.

In this article, we’ll talk about the ten main categories of French pronouns—direct and indirect object pronouns all the way to the relative pronouns. 

There’s a lot of French pronouns rules to process and a hefty load of vocabulary, so spend as much time as you need to read the examples or to practice making sentences on your own, and you’ll be a pronouns expert before you know it. =)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in French Table of Contents
  1. Personal Pronouns
  2. Impersonal Pronouns
  3. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French

1. Personal Pronouns 

Introducing Yourself

Alright, it’s time to make it personal and start with the first thing you think about when you hear “pronouns.”

Personal pronouns are everywhere, in almost every sentence, and you won’t empower your French without a deep and thorough dive into the crux of that matter.

These are the different types of personal pronouns:

  • Subject
  • Stressed
  • Direct object
  • Indirect object
  • Reflexive

We’ll look into every one of these types, but before we do, here’s an overview of what they all look like:

SubjectStressedDirect objectIndirect objectReflexive
jemoimememe
tutoitetete
il; elle; onlui; elle; soile; laluise
nous; onnousnousnousnous
vousvousvousvousvous
ils; elleseux; elleslesleurse

Now, let’s have a closer look at these French pronouns and how to use them. We’ll also look at how they behave and how they compare to their English counterparts.

1- Personal Subject Pronouns

No matter your level of French, you already know these guys. They’re some of the most basic and common words in the language, featured in the very first sentences you ever learned.

These pronouns simply replace the subject of a sentence.

For example:

  • Marie a faim. 

“Marie is hungry.”

  • Elle a faim. 

“She is hungry.”

SubjectExample
je (“I”)Je suis Français. 
“I am French.”
tu (“you”)Tu as raison. 
“You are right.”
il (“he”)


elle (“she”)


on (*)
Il frappe à la porte. 
“He is knocking on the door.”

Elle frappe à la porte. 
“She is knocking at the door.”

On frappe à la porte. 
“Someone is knocking at the door.”
nous, on (“we”)Nous sommes mariés. 
We are married.
vous (“you”)Vous êtes de vrais amis. 
“You are true friends.”
ils, elles (“they”)Ils vont bien. 
“They are doing well.”

(*) On is an odd case. It can be used as an indefinite pronoun or as an alternative to nous.

Depending on the sentence and context, on can translate as “someone,” “one,” or “people.”

  • On pourrait croire que… 

“One could think that…”

  • A l’époque, on pensait que… 

“At the time, people thought that…”

In other cases, on translates into a slightly casual nous. Indeed, in most conversations, you’ll use on instead of nous.

  • On sera un peu en retard ce soir. 

“We will be a bit late tonight.”

  • On va prendre la voiture. 

“We will take the car.”

2- Stressed Pronouns

No need to bang your head anywhere, these pronouns are much more stressed than they are stressful. They’re even pretty straightforward, once you get to know them!

StressedExample
1st person [s]moiC’est moi
“It’s me!”
2nd person [s]toiJ’en ai un. Et toi
“I’ve got one. And you?”
3rd person [s]lui; elle; soiNous sommes différents, lui et moi
“We are different, he and I.”

Avec ou sans elle 
“With or without her”
1st person [p]nousIls sont plus fort que nous
“They are stronger than us.”
2nd person [p]vousNous sommes meilleurs que vous. 
“We are better than you.”
3rd person [p]eux; ellesNe fais pas attention à eux. 
“Don’t mind them.”
Woman Meditating

Don’t let the stressed pronouns get on your nerves!

3- Direct and Indirect Pronouns

Now it’s getting serious! Before we get to these French pronouns examples, we need to talk about how they work and how to place direct and indirect pronouns in a sentence.

First, you need to find out whether you need a COD (Complément d’Objet Direct, not Call of Duty!) or a COI (Complément d’Objet Indirect).

COD answers the question: “Who?” or “What?

COI answers the question: “To whom?” or “To what?

And here are the different forms:

Direct objectIndirect object
1st person [s]meme
2nd person [s]tete
3rd person [s]le; lalui
1st person [p]nousnous
2nd person [p]vousvous
3rd person [p]lesleur
  • Let’s take an example: 

Julie donne une pomme. 

“Julie gives an apple.”

Subject + Verb + ?

Julie donne quoi ? 

“Julie gives what?”

Une pomme. 

“An apple.”


Une pomme is our COD.

Now, we’ll replace une pomme with a direct pronoun and it changes the order of the words:

Subject + Direct Pronoun + Verb.

Julie la donne. 

“Julie gives it.”

  • Let’s take another example: 

Julie parle aux enfants. 

“Julie talks to the kids.”

Subject + Verb + ?

Julie parle à qui ? 

“Julie talks to whom?”

Aux enfants. 

“To the kids.”

Aux enfants is our COI.

Now, we’ll replace aux enfants with an indirect pronoun and change the order to:

Subject + Indirect Pronoun + Verb.

Julie leur parle. 

“Julie talks to them.”

  • And finally, let’s see how to use direct pronouns and indirect pronouns in one single sentence. What’s Julie up to?

Julie donne une pomme aux enfants.  

“Julie gives an apple to the kids.”

We already know that une pomme is COD and aux enfants is COI.

The sentence is built as follows: 

Subject + Direct PronounIndirect Pronoun + Verb

Julie la leur donne. 

“Julie gives it to them.”

Okay, that was heavy! Let’s relax a bit with some more examples to help you get familiar with the structures:

  • Julie donne une pomme à Cyril. (That’s me!)

Julie me la donne. 

“Julie gives it to me.”

  • Julie donne une pomme au lecteur. (She gives it to the reader, that’s you!)

Julie te la donne. 

“Julie gives it to you.”

  • Julie te les donne. 

“Julie gives it to you.”

(But it’s plural; there are several apples.)

  • Julie me les présente. 

“Julie introduces them to me.”

  • Julie te la présente. 

“Julie introduces her to you.”

  • Julie nous la présente. 

“Julie introduces her to us.”

Daughter Giving an Apple to Her Mother

Elle la lui donne. (“She gives it to her.”)

4- Reflexive Pronouns

I’d like to tell you that the worst part is behind us, but reflexive pronouns are still in the way!

Reflexive pronouns are used with reflexive verbs, such as:

  • Se laver
  • S’appeler
  • S’intéresser

While there’s nothing inherently complex about them, English-speakers can find them quite arbitrary. (Why are s’habiller or s’appeler reflexive verbs while manger is not?)

The general idea is that verbs that imply an action on yourself are reflexive, and can usually be translated using an additional “oneself.”

For example:

  • Nous nous lavons. 

“We wash [ourselves].”

  • Je m’appelle Bob. 

“I call [myself] Bob.” = “My name is Bob.”

  • Il se demande. 

“He asks himself.”

  • Elle s’habille. 

She dresses [herself].”

Many verbs involving a motion of some sort are also reflexive.

  • Il s’éloigne. 

“He moves [himself] away.”

  • Je m’assois. 

“I sit [myself].”

ReflexiveExamples
1st person [s]meJe me lève. 
“I stand up.”
2nd person [s]teTu te demandes. 
“You wonder.”
3rd person [s]seElle se promène. 
“She strolls.”
1st person [p]nousNous nous endormons. 
“We fall asleep.”
2nd person [p]vousVous vous rasez. 
“You shave.”
3rd person [p]seIls s’inscrivent. 
“They register.”

2. Impersonal Pronouns

Basic Questions

1- Impersonal Subject Pronouns

If you like to keep it to yourself and never show your true feelings, you have a lot in common with impersonal pronouns! Let’s see how to stay vague in French, starting with the impersonal subject pronouns:

  • Ça; ce; c’ 

“It”

  • Il 

“It”

What? Did you expect another big flashy tab, full of rows and colorful columns?

Now, here’s how to use them:

  • Ça commence maintenant. 

“It starts now.”

  • Ce n’est la première fois. 

“It is not the first time.”

  • C’est terminé. 

“It is over.”

  • Il est impossible d’entrer. 

“It is impossible to enter.”

  • Il est temps. 

“It is time.”

2- French Adverbial Pronouns

Not an overwhelming list either, but I can’t stress enough how important they are!

“there”; “about it”

  • en 

“one”; “some”; “of it”; “of them”

y is used to replace à [quelque chose] (“to [something]”; “about [something]”) or en [quelque chose] (“in [something]”)

This [something] is often a place, but not always, as long as it’s inanimate.

  • Je veux aller à Paris. 

“I want to go to Paris.”

Je veux y aller. 

“I want to go there.”

  • Je pense à mon avenir. 

“I think about my future.”

J’y pense. 

“I think about it.”

  • Je crois en la science. 

“I believe in science.”

J’y crois. 

“I believe in it.”

en is used to replace de(s) ____ (“some ____”; “of ____”)

You’ll see it a lot when talking about quantities.

  • J’ai une pomme. 

“I have an apple.”

J’en ai une. 

“I have one.”

  • J’ai deux frères. 

“I have 2 brothers.”

J’en ai deux. 

“I have two of them.”

  • J’ai beaucoup de cheveux. 

“I have lots of hair.”

J’en ai beaucoup. 

“I have a lot of it.”

  • Il a du temps. 

“He has time.”

Il en a. 

“He has some.”

A Colony of Penguins

Il y en a des milliers. (“There are thousands of them.”)

3- Relative Pronouns

I’ll keep these relatively simple, as they can easily be compared to English.

Of course, it’s never an exact translation, but it will give you a fairly good idea of how to use them in a variety of contexts.

que 
“that”
Tu penses qu’il va pleuvoir ? 
“Do you think that it will rain?”

Je sais que tu es là. 
“I know that you are here.”
qui 
“who”
J’ai un fils qui m’aime. 
“I have a son who loves me.”
où 
“where”; “when”
C’est la maison où je vis. 
“This is the house where I live.”

Le jour où je t’ai rencontrée 
“The day when I met you”
dont 
“whose”; “that”
L’homme dont c’est le chapeau 
“The man whose hat it is”

La personne dont tu parles 
“The person [that] you’re talking about”
lequel(s) 
laquelle(s)
“which”; “that”
Le lit sur lequel nous dormons
“The bed on which we sleep”

Les rues dans lesquelles nous travaillons
The streets in which we are working”

/! You can’t use these to talk about people.

4- Demonstrative Pronouns

The demonstrative pronoun celui replaces something that was mentioned earlier.

  • J’aime le café mais pas celui de Starbucks. 

“I like coffee, but not the one from Starbucks.”

Sure, you could also say: 

J’aime le café mais pas le café de Starbucks. 

“I like coffee, but not the coffee from Starbucks.”

But it sounds clumsy, doesn’t it?

This demonstrative pronoun has masculine, feminine, and plural forms:

Masc. [s]celui
“The” / “This” / “That one”
C’est celui que je préfère. 
“This is the one I prefer.”
Masc. [p]ceux
“These” / “Those”
Ceux du fond
“Those in the back”
Fem. [s]celle
“The” / “This” / “That one”
Je te donne celle que tu veux. 
“I give you the one you want.”
Fem. [p]celles
“These” / “Those”
Celles de gauche 
“These on the left”

You can’t end a phrase with these demonstrative pronouns in their base form, or put them right before a verb. They simply don’t like it!

Instead, you have to add a suffix. It can be either ci (here) or (there).

  • J’ai deux livres. Je te prête celui.
  • J’ai deux livres, je te prête celui-ci. 

“I have two books, I’ll lend you this one.”

  • J’aime ces deux histoires mais je préfère celle-là. 

“I love these two stories, but I prefer that one.”

Two Kids Reading in the Dark

C’est celui que je préfère. (“This is the one I prefer.”)

5- Interrogative Pronouns

In case your brain is already melting out of your ears, let’s keep this one as simple as possible. Nothing complicated about interrogative pronouns, really!

qui 
“who”
Qui es-tu ? 
“Who are you?”
où 
“where”
Où allons-nous ? 
“Where are we going?”
quand 
“when”
Quand partez-vous ? 
“When do you leave?”
quoi 
“what”
A quoi penses-tu ? 
“What are you thinking about?”
lequel


lesquels


laquelle


lesquelles
“which one”
Lequel tu préfères ? 
“Which one do you prefer?”

Lesquels sont les plus gros ? 
“Which ones are the biggest?”

Laquelle me va le mieux ? 
“Which one suits me best?”

Lesquelles veux-tu voir ? 
“Which ones do you want to see?”
quel
quels
quelle
quelles
“which”
Quelle heure est-il ? 
“What time is it?”

/! These aren’t technically pronouns (they’re interrogative adjectives) but it felt wrong not to include them. And they were crying.

6- Indefinite Pronouns

Indefinite pronouns are these vague fellows who don’t want to be too specific about what’s going on or who’s involved. There are many of them, and they prove to be very useful.

Here are a few of the most common ones:

tout 
“everything”; “anything”; “all”
Tout est possible. 
“Anything is possible.”
rien 
“nothing”
Rien n’est impossible. 
“Nothing is impossible.”
personne 
“nobody”
Personne n’est parfait. 
“Nobody’s perfect.”
chacun 
“everyone”; “every man”
Chacun pour soi 
“Every man for himself”
tout le monde 
“everybody”
Tout le monde est là ? 
“Is everybody here?”
quelqu’un 
“someone”
Quelqu’un va venir. 
“Someone will come.”
quelque chose 
“something”
Quelque chose te tracasse ? 
“Is there something bothering you?”
certains 
“some [people]”
Certains sont venus. 
“Some people came.”

3. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French

Improve Listening

In this French pronouns guide, you’ve learned everything about French pronouns, from direct to indirect object pronouns, French relative pronouns, and many more! 

Did we forget any important pronouns? Do you feel ready to come up with impressive sentences using all of these new tools? Or do you need more French pronouns help?

I’m gonna say it again, but the key is to take it one step at a time. Understanding French pronouns doesn’t happen overnight. Start making sentences with personal subject pronouns, then keep building from there! 

  • Sophie a acheté des pommes pour Nicolas.
  • Elle a acheté des pommes pour Nicolas.
  • Elle a acheté des pommes pour lui.
  • Elle en a acheté pour lui.

Make sure to explore FrenchPod101, as it has plenty of free resources for you to practice your grammar and learn new words. The vocabulary lists are also a great way to review the words and learn their pronunciation.
Remember that you can also use our premium service, MyTeacher, to get personal one-on-one coaching. Practice using French pronouns with your private teacher so they can give you personalized feedback and advice, and help you with your pronunciation.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in French

Premium PLUS: The Golden Ticket for Language-Learning

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어디에 살고 있습니까?

eodieseo salgo isseumnikka

“Where do you live?”

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도쿄에 살고 있습니다.

Tokyo-e salgo isseumnida.

“I live in Tokyo.”

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eunhaeng gyejwaleul mandeulgo sip-eoyo.

I want to open a bank account.

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French Word Order: From Basic Sentences to Writing Laws

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Do you ever get this feeling when speaking French? You have all the words you need to make the perfect sentence, but they just don’t fit together. This is what happens when you’re not comfortable with the word order and need to learn about the specifics of the correct French sentence structures.

It may seem confusing at first, but bear with me for a moment and I trust that you’ll find it to be quite simple. Except for a few tricky exceptions, the structures are always the same and are often very similar to English. With all the tips and tricks from this article and a bit of practice, it will come naturally in no time!

In this guide, we’ll explain everything you need to know about the French sentence structure, from basic sentences for beginners to impressive complex statements for sophisticated talkers.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in French Table of Contents
  1. Ordering Words in French
  2. Simple Sentences with Subject, Verb, and Object
  3. How to Build Complex Sentences
  4. Asking Questions
  5. Negative Sentences
  6. Practical Cases
  7. Le Mot De La Fin

1. Ordering Words in French

Improve listening

Rule #1: French is SVO

Like many other languages throughout the world, French is what we call an SVO language. This means that the default word order is: Subject Verb Object.

  • {Je mange une pomme.} (“I eat an apple.”)

Rule #2: Don’t Skip the Subject

And unlike similarly rooted languages, such as Spanish or Italian, we don’t usually drop the subject of the sentence, even when it’s a pronoun.

  • I speak French.
  • (Yo) hablo Frances. (Spanish)
  • (Io) parlo Francese. (Italian)
  • Je parle Français.

Rule #3: Rules are Meant to be Broken

These are mainly the French word order rules of simple declarative sentences, but as soon as we enter imperative, interrogative, or negative sentences territory, it gets a bit wilder. I mean…it’s French we’re talking about.

And one more thing: Master Yoda is allowed to use OSV sentences and still sound cool, but it’s forbidden to the rest of us.

An Image of Yoda

Le Français je parle. (“French I speak.”)

2. Simple Sentences with Subject, Verb, and Object

In the following sections, we’ll work with the most common type of sentences: declaratives.

A declarative sentence is used to make a statement. It declares or states something, and ends with a period. We can’t use declarative sentences to ask questions or give orders.

Let’s get back to our basic declarative sentence: Je parle Français. (“I speak French.”)

In this sentence, I’m stating that I speak French.

Like we mentioned before, there are mainly two things you need to know about declarative sentences and their basic word order in French:

  1. The word order is Subject + Verb + Object.
  2. We don’t drop the subject, even when it’s a pronoun.

To these basic rules, I would also add:

  1. Verbs are conjugated. Their ending depends on the subject.
  • Ils parlent Français. (“They speak French.”)
  • Nous parlons Français. (“We speak French.”)
  1. Objects must agree with the subject. Their ending also varies.
  • Il est Américain. (“He is American.”)
  • Elle est Américaine. (“She is American.”)

/! The main exception to the S+V+O rule is the imperative mood, where the structure becomes: V+O.

  • Vous parlez Français. (“You speak French.”) → Parlez Français. (“Speak French.”)
  • Nous mangeons des pommes. (“We eat apples.”) → Mangeons des pommes. (“Let’s eat apples.”)
A Girl Choosing between a Green Apple and Red Apple

Elle mange des pommes. (“She eats apples.”)

3. How to Build Complex Sentences

Now that we have the basics covered, it’s time to add more ingredients into the mix and spice it up with adverbs, adjectives, and pronouns to gradually make our sentence more exciting!

1 – Adding Adjectives:

Adjectives describe nouns to make them more interesting. Let’s see where to place them in a sentence.

According to French word order, adjectives usually go AFTER the noun they describe.

  • Une pomme verte (“A green apple”)

However, some of the most common adjectives go BEFORE the noun.

  • Une grosse pomme (“A big apple”)

Put in a sentence, it looks like this:

  • Il mange une pomme verte. (“He’s eating a green apple.”)

2 – Adding Adverbs:

Adverbs work together with and describe verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs to modify their meaning or make a sentence more precise.

When the adverb modifies a verb, it usually comes AFTER this verb. The word order is: S + V + Adv.

  • Je parle lentement. (“I speak slowly.”)

Then, if we have an object, it would be: S + V + O + Adv.

  • Je parle Français couramment. (“I speak French fluently.”)

When the adverb modifies an adverb or adjective, it usually comes AFTER the verb and BEFORE the adverb or adjective. The word order is: S + V + Adv + Adv.

  • Je parle très lentement. (“I speak very slowly.”)

When we get to this level of complexity, things start becoming a bit more flexible.

For instance, both sentences are correct:

  • Je parle Français couramment. (“I speak French fluently.”)
  • Je parle couramment Français. (“I speak French fluently.”)

However, it comes with exceptions, such as the very common bien (“well”) which is placed BEFORE the object.

  • Je parle bien Français. (“I speak French well.”)
  • Je parle vraiment bien Français. (“I speak French very well.”)
  • Je parle Français bien.
A Blackboard Drawing of a Person with Colored Sticky Notes

Not too confused with the colors, are you?

3 – Adding Pronouns

Brace yourself, this is where French language word order gets tough. Understanding the word order of pronouns in French isn’t always a walk in the park, and we’ll really just scratch the surface here. 

Subject pronouns don’t move:

  • Nicolas mange une pomme. (“Nicolas eats an apple.”)
  • Il mange une pomme. (“He eats an apple.”)

Same thing for stressed pronouns:

  • Il mange une pomme avec ses amis. (“He eats an apple with his friends.”)
  • Il mange une pomme avec eux. (“He eats an apple with them.”)

However, direct and indirect pronouns are not as well-behaved.

  • Nicolas donne une pomme. (“He gives an apple.”)
  • Nicolas la donne. (“He gives it.”)
  • Il donne une pomme à ses amis. (“He gives an apple to his friends.”)
  • Il leur donne une pomme. (“He gives them an apple.”)
  • Il la leur donne. (“He gives it to them.”)

And what happens when we put everything together?

  • Je leur parle Français très lentement. (“I speak French with them very slowly.”)
  • Il leur donne gentiment une pomme verte. (“He gently gives them a green apple.”)

4 – Adding Prepositions

Prepositions are words that usually precede a noun or pronoun and express a relationship to another element of the sentence. Prepositional phrases often answer questions such as:

  • Where? Il mange une pomme dans la cuisine. (“He eats an apple in the kitchen.”)
  • When? Il mange une pomme après le dîner. (“He eats an apple after dinner.”)
  • How?
    • Il mange une pomme avec eux. (“He eats an apple with them.”)
    • Il mange une pomme sans se presser. (“He eats an apple without rushing.”)
    • Il mange une pomme avec soin. (“He eats an apple with care.”)

Prepositions can be placed BEFORE or AFTER the verb. In some cases, you can freely choose, and in other situations, only one option will make sense.

  • Après le dîner, je mange une pomme. (“After dinner, I eat an apple.”)
  • Je mange une pomme après le dîner. (“I eat an apple after dinner.”)
  • Il mange une pomme sans se presser. (“He eats an apple without rushing.”)
  • Sans se presser, il mange une pomme. (“Without rushing, he eats an apple.”)

In these two examples, both versions are correct.

But sometimes, you need to know the verb for the preposition to be relevant:

  • Je rentre à la maison. (“I go back home.”)

You would not say “Home, I go back,” and it would sound equally awkward in French.

  • Je donne une pomme à mon ami. (“I give an apple to my friend.”)

Similarly, it wouldn’t make sense to mention the recipient before the action is stated.

To combine prepositions, you can simply apply the same logic when choosing where to place them:

  • Après le dîner, je rentre à la maison sans me presser. (“After dinner, I go back home without rushing.”)
  • Sans me presser, je mange une pomme avec eux dans la cuisine. (“Without rushing, I eat an apple with them in the kitchen.”)
A Man Complaining about His Food at a Restaurant


These are not the words I ordered!

4. Asking Questions

The word order in French questions isn’t always SVO.

Questions can take several different forms in French, depending on whether you’re talking or writing, as well as how formal you want to be.

Let’s go back to our apple-eating example: Tu manges une pomme.

Here’s how to say: “Do you eat an apple?”

1. Tu manges une pomme ? (SVO)

2. Est-ce que tu manges une pomme ? (Est-ce que + SVO)

3. Mangestu une pomme ? (VSO)

Now I guess the last one is confusing: Why do we suddenly invert the subject and verb?

This form is used only in writing or in very formal speech. Among friends, with random strangers, or in most business settings, you would stick to one of the first two options. I’d say both are equally common.

Now, what if we add some interrogative pronouns and adverbs?

Let’s see how to use words like: Quand (“When”), Qui (“Who”), Comment (“How”), (“Where?”).

“Where do you eat?”

1. Tu manges ?

2. est-ce que tu manges ?

3. mangestu ?

“When do you eat?”

1. Tu manges quand ?

2. Quand est-ce que tu manges ?

3. Quand mangestu ?

5.  Negative Sentences

Luckily, this is the last case, because I’m seriously running out of colors!

In this section, we’ll have a look at the word order in negative sentences.

Negative structures are placed around the verb and before the preposition or object.

  • Je ne mange pas de pommes. (“I don’t eat an apple.”)
  • Je ne mange pas dans la cuisine. (“I don’t eat in the kitchen.”)
  • Je ne mange pas vite. (“I don’t eat fast.”)

The same thing goes for other negative structures:

  • Je ne mange plus dans la cuisine. (“I don’t eat in the kitchen anymore.”)
  • Je ne mange jamais dans la cuisine. (“I never eat in the kitchen.”)
Girl Writing

That’s how I learned negative sentences!

6. Practical Cases

Now, it’s time to practice everything we’ve been learning today! We’ll take it slow and do it step-by-step. At any time, feel free to go back through the article if you’re having doubts. 

Try to come up with the French translations for these sentences. You can use a conjugation table if you’re not sure how to deal with parler (“to speak”).

1. “We speak.” – _________________

2. “We speak French.” – _________________

3. “We speak French slowly.” – _________________

4. “We speak French slowly with her.” – _________________

5. “We speak with her in the kitchen.” – _________________

6. “After dinner, we speak with her in the kitchen.” – _________________

7. “We never speak with her in the kitchen.” – _________________

8. “Do you speak with her in the kitchen?” – _________________


“Where do I put these verbs again?”

Kid Stacking Colored Wooden Blocks

“Where do I put these verbs again?”

[SPOILER] And here are the translations:

  1. “We speak.” – Nous parlons
  2. “We speak French.” – Nous parlons Français.
  3. “We speak French slowly.” – Nous parlons Français lentement.
  4. “We speak French slowly with her.” – Nous parlons Français lentement avec elle.
  5. “We speak with her in the kitchen.” – Nous parlons Français avec elle dans la cuisine.
  6. “After dinner, we speak with her in the kitchen.” – Après dîner, nous parlons avec dans la cuisine.
  7. “We never speak with her in the kitchen.” – Nous ne parlons jamais avec elle dans la cuisine.
  8. “Do you speak with her in the kitchen?” – Est-ce que tu parles avec elle dans la cuisine ?

7. Le Mot De La Fin

In this guide, you’ve learned a lot about French word order and the correct French sentence structures, from the basics to the most advanced parts such as French pronoun order.

Did we forget any important structure you would like to learn about? Do you feel ready to assemble ambitious sentences, using everything you’ve learned today?

As we’ve seen with the exercises, a good way to practice French word order is to start easy and slowly build up to complex sentences, one piece at a time.

Make sure to explore FrenchPod101.com, as we have plenty of free resources for you to practice your grammar and learn new words. Our vocabulary lists are also a great way to review the words and learn their pronunciation.
Remember that you can also use our Premium PLUS service, MyTeacher, to get personal one-on-one coaching. Practice talking about word order in French with your private teacher so they can give you personalized feedback and advice, and help you with the pronunciation.

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“Time Will Tell” – Telling Time in French

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Do you sometimes get the impression that time is flying away, riding a winged clock out of your reach, or is it just me? Flying or not, time is the single most precious thing we have, and being able to discuss it will prove useful within your first few days in France.

Whether you want to talk about your day, plan something, talk about schedules, or just answer someone on the street asking you for the time, learning about telling time in French is essential. You’ll have to know the basic vocabulary for “hour” or “minutes” in French, some numbers, and a variety of valuable time-related phrases and keywords.

In this article, you’ll learn everything about telling the time in French, from the units to the AM / PM system, common questions & answers, and much more!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in French Table of Contents
  1. What Time is it?
  2. Time Units
  3. AM or PM?
  4. How to Give the Time
  5. Hour Divisions
  6. From Dusk till Dawn
  7. Expressions and Proverbs about Time in French
  8. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French

1. What Time is it?

Surreal Scene with a Large Clock

Le temps presse ! (“Time is of the essence!”)

Before you learn how to tell the time in French, you’ll need to understand when someone is asking you for it. And in the process, you’ll learn how to ask for the time yourself. As you can expect, there isn’t only one way of asking about time in French, but the most popular, by far, is:

  • Quelle heure est-il ? [Formal]

“What time is it?”

If you have some experience with polite sentences, you may have noticed the inverted subject (est-il instead of il est). Indeed, this is the formal sentence that most French lessons teach you, but there are several other ways you can ask (or be asked) for the time:

  • Quelle heure il est ? [Casual]
  • Il est quelle heure ? [Casual]


Both of these phrases mean “What time is it?”

Let’s have a look at other popular alternatives:

  • Est-ce que vous avez l’heure ? [Formal]
  • Est-ce que tu as l’heure ? [Casual]
  • T’as l’heure ? [Very casual]

These translate to “Do you have the time?”

And of course, if you’re asking some stranger in the street or anyone you’re not yet familiar with, don’t forget to add some honey by starting with a polite Excusez-moi (“Excuse me”), and maybe a nice s’il vous plaît (“please”) at the end!

  • Excusez-moi, est-ce que vous avez l’heure, s’il vous plaît ? [Very formal]

“Excuse me, do you have the time, please?”

2. Time Units

Time

Before we get to the juicy part, let’s talk vocabulary for a moment. Obviously, to give the time in French, you’ll have to be in the clear about numbers. At the minimum, you need to be able to count up to fifty-nine, but don’t worry if you can’t do that yet—we also have some magic words to save you the trouble! 

However, I would say that counting up to 12 is an absolute minimum, so just in case, let’s review this quickly:

1. un2. deux3. trois4. quatre5. cinq6. six
7. sept8. huit9. neuf10. dix11. onze12. douze

Now, here are our time units:

  • une heure (“hour”)
  • une minute (“minute”)
  • une seconde (“second”)

So, what happens when you combine these words with numbers?

  • Trois heures (“three hours”)
  • Dix minutes (“ten minutes”)
  • Trente secondes (“thirty seconds”)

And here’s a glimpse of how to tell time in French with minutes, though we’ll go more into this later.

  • Cinq heures vingt (“five hours twenty minutes”)

In most cases, when the number of minutes closely follows the hour, like above, you can omit the word minutes (“minutes”). 

    → You’ll find these words, as well as the numbers, in our free vocabulary list on Talking about Time with audio recordings to practice your pronunciation!
A Sundial

Un cadran solaire (“A sundial”)

3. AM or PM?

Frequently asked question: Should I use the twelve- or twenty-four-hour system in French?

Answer: As you wish! (But there is a twist.)

The twelve-hour system used to be popular in northern Europe, but nowadays, it’s slowly losing the battle against the objectively superior twenty-four-hour system. Let’s see how it looks.

  • Il est 5 heures du matin. (“It is 5 AM” or literally “It is five hours in the morning.”)
  • Il est 5 heures de l’après-midi. (“It is 5 PM” or “It is five hours in the afternoon.”)
  • Il est 8 heures du soir. (“It is 8 PM” or “It is eight hours in the evening.”)

Dealing with twelve hours makes it easily confusing when you’re talking to someone from the same time zone, but it gets ridiculous with globalization and our tendency to communicate and schedule events with people from all around the world.

Now, if you also consider that AM (which stands for “Ante Meridiem,” as opposed to “Post Meridiem”) could possibly be the abbreviation for après-midi (French for “afternoon”), you’ll understand why it’s losing in popularity.

Let’s see what the twenty-four-hour system looks like:

  • Il est 5 heures. (“It’s 5 AM.”)
  • Il est 17 heures. (“It’s 5 PM.”)
  • Il est 20 heures. (“It’s 20 PM.”)

Now that being said, there are still MANY people using the twelve-hour system. It’s not even old-fashioned yet and you should be ready to understand it, even if you choose not to use it yourself.

And as tempting as it was to add a lecture on the Latin origin of meridiem, I’m all about self-control and will keep my sophisticated pedantism in check. Hey, did you know “pedant” comes from the Italian “pedante,” derived from the Latin “paedogogus?” Oh no, I did it again!

Woman Looking at a Clock

Most hated object in the house: The alarm clock!

4. How to Give the Time

Alright, I’ve kept you waiting long enough. Here’s how to tell the time in French:

  • Il est _____. (“It is _____”).

Did it feel anticlimactic? I feel like it’s not quite the big reveal.

Okay, but that’s not all of it! Here’s how you can make it more interesting:

  • Il est 8 heures. (“It is 8.”)
  • Il est bientôt 8 heures. (“It is 8 soon.”)
  • Il sera bientôt 8 heures. (“It will be 8 soon.”)
  • Il est presque 8 heures. (“It is almost 8.”)
  • Il est 8 heures passées. (“It is past 8.”)
  • Il est encore 8 heures. (“It is still 8.”)
  • Il n’est pas encore 8 heures. (“It is not 8 yet.”)
  • Vers 8 heures. (“Around 8.”)
  • Aux environs de 8h. (“Around 8.”)
  • Il est 8 heures pile. (“It is 8 sharp.”)

Il est 8 heures pétantes. (“It is 8 sharp.”)

Hold on, these two are interesting!

Pile or tout pile is rather straightforward. When it’s not used for the time, you can find it as an equivalent of “sharp,” “exactly,” or “right,” as in:

A midi pile. (“At noon sharp.”)
On a pile 10 mètres carrés. (“We have exactly ten meters square.”)
Il a visé pile au centre. (“He aimed right at the center.”)

Il est 8 heures pétantes literally means “It is eight blasting hours,” or “It is eight farting hours.”

In 1786 in Paris, there used to be a small canon next to the Palais-Royal. It was only forty centimeters long and was equipped with a magnifying glass to concentrate the sun’s rays. Every sunny day at noon sharp, it would set the gunpowder on fire and BOOM!

And if you’re dealing with the twelve-hour system, don’t forget about the trinity of matin, après-midi, and soir:

  • Il est 4 heures du matin. (“It is four in the morning.”)
  • Il est 4 heures de l’après-midi. (“It is four in the afternoon.”)
  • Il est 9 heures du soir. (“It is nine in the evening.”)
Woman Pointing at an Alarm Clock

Il est 8 heures pile. (“It is 8 sharp.”)

5. Hour Divisions

I promised you a magic workaround if you don’t know all the numbers from 13 to 59. Here we are!

  • Il est 8 heures et demi. (“It is half past 8.”) Literally: “It is 8 hours and half.”
  • Il est 2 heures et quart. (“It is quarter past 2.”) Literally: “It is 2 hours and quarter.”
  • Il est 3 heures moins le quart. (“It is quarter to 3.”) Literally: “It is 3 hours minus quarter.”
  • Il est 9 heures moins 10. (“It is 10 to 9.”) Literally: “It is 9 hours minus 10.”

/! This only works in the twelve-hour system:

  • Il est 8 heures et demi.
  • Il est 20 heures et demi.
  • Il est 20 heures 30.

6. From Dusk till Dawn

Improve Listening

Now that we know how to ask for the time and tell the time in French, let’s get more vocabulary on the various moments of the day. Describing time in French becomes much simpler when you know how to say the general time.
Unless you’re living in Saint-Petersburg and partying throughout the endless white nights, or hiding from vampires during the thirty days of night in Utqiaġvik, Alaska, your typical day should start with a sunrise and end with a sunset.

Morning
  • Le lever du soleil (“Sunrise”)
  • L’aube (“Dawn”)
  • Le matin (“Morning”)
  • Le début de matinée (“Early morning”)
  • La matinée (“Morning”)
  • La fin de matinée (“Late morning”)
Afternoon
  • Le midi (“Noon”)
  • Le début d’après-midi (“Early afternoon”)
  • L’après-midi (“Afternoon”)
  • La fin d’après-midi (“Late afternoon”)
  • La fin de journée (“Late afternoon”)
Evening & Night
  • Le début de soirée (“Early evening”)
  • La soirée (“Evening”)
  • La fin de soirée (“Late evening”)
  • Le crépuscule (“Dusk”)
  • Le coucher du soleil (“Sunset”)
  • La nuit (“Night”)
  • Minuit (“Midnight”)
Sunset Near a Church

Un coucher de soleil (“A sunset”)

7. Expressions and Proverbs about Time in French

Did you notice that the French don’t ask “What time is it?” but “What hour is it?”

Many time-related French expressions are surprisingly similar to their English equivalent, but it’s interesting to see the differences:

  • La nuit des temps [Literally: “The night of times”]

(“The dawn of times”)

  • Ces derniers temps  [“Those latest times”]

(“Lately”)

  • En temps normal [“In normal time”]

(“Under normal circumstances”)

  • En temps utile [“In useful time”]
  • En temps voulu [“In desired time”]

(“In due time”)

  • Chercher midi à quatorze heures. [“To look for noon at 2 PM”]

(“To look for unnecessary complications”)

And of course, we do have the infamous proverb: Le temps, c’est de l’argent. (“Time is money.”)

Even though we’re as deep into capitalism as any of our European neighbors, the average French doesn’t live by this proverb and people tend to think of time as a commodity and not just something they convert into cash. 

And even without pondering about the things money can’t buy, there’s an Epicurean component to the French Art de vivre (“Art of Living”) that keeps people from being swallowed by their working life and helps them prioritize what they work for.

Spiralling Clock

Passed time never comes back.

8. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French

Basic Questions

In this guide, you’ve learned everything about telling the time in French, from the common questions and answers to time units, vocabulary, and expressions. Did I forget any important time-related word or expression that you know? Do you feel ready to ask random French strangers for the time, or to answer when you’re asked for it?

Understanding time in French may take time. A good exercise to practice telling the time is simply to try and think in French when you look at your watch. Try to form the sentence in your head using what you’ve learned today, and you’ll soon become more comfortable. Just take it easy and go at your own pace. =)

FrenchPod101 also has tons of vocabulary lists with audio recordings and free resources to boost your studies and keep your French learning fresh and entertaining!

Remember that you can also use our premium service, MyTeacher, to get personal one-on-one coaching and practice with your private teacher. Using assignments, personalized exercises, and recorded audio samples —and by reviewing yours—they can help you improve your pronunciation much faster. 
Happy learning on FrenchPod101!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in French

Be the GPS with French Directions: Left in French & More



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Have you ever been lost in a big capital city, without batteries in your phone or credit on your SIM card? And when was the last time you’ve bought one of these unfoldable paper maps? Luckily, there’s one thing you can always rely on when you’re completely lost in France: helpful locals!

But it comes at a price. Outside of Paris, it can be difficult to find English-speaking help and you’ll have to be ready to break the language barrier. Asking directions in French is easy. Understanding the answer is a different story (but “left” and “right” in French aren’t hard). Don’t worry, we’ll get you there. =)

First, you’ll need to know the basic vocabulary, such as right, left, North, or South in French. But you’ll also need to know the usual movement verbs and the most common structures. In this guide, we’ll cover everything you need to know to find your way around France, from the landmarks to the transportation, taxi phrases, and polite greetings. Time to hit the road!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Around Town in French

Table of Contents
  1. On the Map: Compass Directions in French
  2. Simple Directions in French Using Landmarks
  3. On the Road: Driving Directions in French
  4. Must-Know Phrases: Asking for Directions
  5. Must-Know Phrases: Giving Directions in French
  6. The French vs. Directions
  7. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French


1. On the Map: Compass Directions in French


Directions

Whether you prefer the modern conveniences of a GPS or ever-reliable paper maps, and whenever you’re navigating through unknown regions or talking about the French territory with your local friends, you’ll need to know the basic cardinal directions and how to use them in sentences.

So, before we dive into anything more complex, let’s start with that!

Le nord
“North”
Nous irons vers le nord.
“We will head north.”
Le sud
“South”
Elle habite au sud de Paris.
“She’s living south of Paris.”
L’est
“East”
Annecy est à deux heures à l’est de Lyon.
“Annecy is two hours east of Lyon.”
L’ouest
“West”
L’europe de l’ouest
“Western Europe”
Le nord-est
“Northeast”
Ils vivent au nord-est de la Russie.
“They are living northeast of Russia.”
Le nord-ouest
“Northwest”
Le nord-ouest des Alpes est une belle région.
“The northwest of the Alps is a beautiful region.”
Le sud-est
“Southeast”
Il fait toujours beau dans le sud-est.
“It’s always sunny in the southeast.”
Le sud-ouest
“Southwest”
Je ne suis jamais descendu dans le sud-ouest.
“I’ve never been down southwest.”


Now that you know how to navigate map directions in French, here are a few more useful words to talk about the French territory:

Région
“Region”
La région Hauts-de-France
“The Hauts-de-France region”
France is divided into thirteen regions whose names changed recently, in 2016.
Département
“Department”
Le Pas-de-Calais est un département Français.
“Pas-de-Calais is a French department.”
Each region is subdivided into smaller departments.

There are currently 101 departments on the French territory, including overseas departments.
La côte
“The coast”
On va sur la côte pour l’été.
“We’re heading to the coast for the summer.”
La frontière
“The border”
Elle habite près de la frontière Belge.
“She’s living near the Belgium border.”


    → Make sure to visit our vocabulary list about Direction Words, with audio recordings to practice your pronunciation. It’s freely available on FrenchPod101.


A Treasure Map

Une carte aux trésors (“A treasure map”)



2. Simple Directions in French Using Landmarks


Time to fold your map and get down to business! You’ve arrived at your destination, but there’s still a lot of unknown ground to cover. You’ll need some serious vocabulary to navigate through this new city and ask locals for directions.

In this chapter, we’ll cover all the essential city landmarks, from transport hubs to city buildings, streets, and key indoor locations.

1- Transports



Un aéroport
“Airport”
Je voudrais aller à l’aéroport d’Orly.
“I would like to go to the Orly airport.”
Une gare
“Train station”
Mon train part de la gare Montparnasse.
“My train is leaving from the Montparnasse station.”
Une gare routière
Une gare de bus
“Bus station”
Pouvez-vous m’indiquer la gare routière ?
“Could you tell me where the bus station is?”
Une station de métro
“Metro station”
Je cherche la station de métro la plus proche.
“I’m looking for the closest metro station.”
Un parking
“Parking”
J’ai laissé ma voiture au parking.
“I left my car at the parking.”


2- In the City



Un hotel
“Hotel”
Une nuit d’hotel
“A hotel night”
Un parc
“Park”
Je me promène au parc de Fontainebleau.
“I’m strolling at the Fontainebleau park.”
Une banque
“Bank”
Je dois aller à la banque pour un retrait.
“I need to go to the bank for a withdrawal.”
Un magasin
“Shop”
Un petit magasin d’antiquités
“A small antique shop”
Une poste
“Post office”
Je vais déposer mon colis à la poste.
“I will drop my parcel at the post office.”
Un marché
“Market”
Je fais mes courses au marché le samedi.
“I shop at the market on Saturdays.”


An Airport Terminal

Un aéroport (“Airport”)



3- In the Street



Un rue
“Street”
J’habite rue Saint Martin.
“I live on the Saint Martin street.”
Une avenue
“Avenue”
L’avenue Baltique est près du rond-point Albert II.
“The Baltique Avenue is near the Albert II roundabout.”
Un croisement; une intersection
“Intersection”
On te prendra à cette intersection.
“We’ll pick you up at the intersection.”
Un feu
“Traffic light”
Je m’arrête au feu rouge et j’attends le feu vert.
“I stop at the red light and wait for the green light.”
The literal meaning of Un feu is “Fire,” but we don’t actually use boric acid to make green fire at our intersections! You should probably not do it at home either.
Une station service
“Gas station”
On va faire le plein à la prochaine station service.
“We will refuel at the next gas station.”
Un passage piéton
“Crosswalk”
Il y a un passage piéton sur votre gauche.
“There is a crosswalk on your left.”


4- Key Indoor Locations



Les toilettes
“Toilets”
Excusez-moi, je cherche les toilettes.
“Excuse me, I’m looking for the toilets.”
Un ascenseur
“Elevator”
Prenez l’ascenseur si votre sac est lourd.
“Take the elevator if your bag is heavy.”
Un escalator
“Escalator”
Prenez l’escalator jusqu’au troisième étage.
“Take the elevator up to the third floor.”
Des escaliers
“Stairs”
Descendez les escaliers jusqu’au parking sous-terrain.
“Take the stairs down to the underground parking.”
L’entrée
“Entrance”
L’entrée principale
“The main entrance”
La sortie
“Exit”
La sortie de secours
“The emergency exit”
Les caisses
“Cashier”
Où sont les caisses, s’il vous plait ?
“Where is the cashier, please?”


    → Learn more about city locations with our free vocabulary list on the most useful words to navigate Around Town.


Exit Sign

La sortie de secours (“The emergency exit”)



3. On the Road: Driving Directions in French


When you’re asking for directions or explaining to somebody how to reach their destination, you’ll need to know how to say “left” and “right” in French, but that’s not it! There are many direction words you can use to precisely pinpoint a location or accurately describe a route.

Here are the most frequently used words for telling directions in French:

Devant
“In front of”
On se retrouve devant la gare.
“Let’s meet in front of the train station.”
Derrière
“Behind”
Mon taxi attend derrière la gare.
“My cab is waiting behind the train station.”
La gauche
“Left”
La première à gauche
“First on the left”
La droite
“Right”
La troisième à droite
“Third on the right”
Loin
“Far”
Est-ce que c’est loin d’ici ?
“Is it far from here?”
Près
“Near”
Je travaille près de la poste.
“I work near the post office.”
A côté de
“Next to”
A côté de l’arrêt de bus
“Next to the bus stop”
De l’autre côté de
“On the other side of”
De l’autre côté de la rue
“On the other side of the street”
En face de
“In front of”
En face de la cathédrale
“In front of the cathedral”
A l’opposé de
“Opposite”
A l’opposé de
“Opposite”


GPS on Top of a Map

Un GPS de voiture (“Car GPS”)



4. Must-Know Phrases: Asking for Directions


Now that you’re equipped with a solid vocabulary on directions and many example phrases, let’s take a moment to address what I call the “social lubricant”: a bit of gentle grease to polish your interactions with locals and make them pleasantly smooth.

In other words, let’s make your mom proud and learn how to be polite in French!

1- Making First Contact


Asking Directions

Here’s your bread-and-butter:

  • Bonjour
    “Hello” / “Good morning” / “Good day”


  • Bonsoir
    “Good evening”


  • Excusez-moi
    “Excuse me”


From these few words, you can make different combinations, the most polite (that I usually keep for an elderly audience) being:

  • Bonjour monsieur, excusez-moi…
    “Hello sir, excuse me…”


  • Bonjour madame, excusez-moi…
    “Hello madam, excuse me…”


2- Ask for Help


Here are a few variations on “where is”:

  • Est-ce que vous savez où est la Cathédrale Saint-Machin ?
    “Do you know where the Saint-Machin Cathedral is?”


  • Je cherche la place Dauphine.
    “I’m looking for the Place Dauphine.”


  • Pouvez-vous m’indiquer la rue Sainte-Bidule ?
    “Can you tell me where the Saint-Bidule street is?”


And a couple questions on distances:

  • Est-ce qu’on est loin de la gare Montparnasse ?
    “Are we far from the Montparnasse station?”


  • Est-ce que vous pouvez m’indiquer le métro le plus proche ?
    “Can you tell me where the closest metro station is?”


3- Wrap Things Up


  • Merci.
    “Thank you.”


  • Merci beaucoup !
    “Thank you very much!”


  • Merci pour votre aide.
    “Thank you for your help.”


Man Asking a Woman for Directions

Sometimes, it takes a wrong turn to get to the right place.



5. Must-Know Phrases: Giving Directions in French


There are a few situations where you’ll need to give directions:

  • When explaining to friends where you live
  • If you blend in so well that locals start asking you for directions (it will happen before you know it!)
  • While in a taxi, navigating your driver toward your destination


Here’s one last list of useful words, as well as the most common phrases in everyday situations.

1- Horizontal Directions



Tout droit
“Straight”
Marchez tout droit pendant 100 mètres.
“Walk straight for 100 meters.”
Faire demi-tour
“To double back”
Roulez jusqu’au prochain rond-point et faites demi-tour.
“Drive until the next roundabout and double back.”
Tourner
“To turn”
Après l’église, tournez à gauche.
“After the church, turn left.”


2- Vertical Directions



Un étage
“Floor”
J’habite au 7ème étage, sans ascenseur.
“I live on the seventh floor, without a lift.”
Un sous-sol
“Underground”
Un sous-sol
“Underground”
En haut
“Up”
En haut
“Up”
En bas
“Down”; “Downstairs”
Il y a une épicerie en bas de chez moi.
“There is a grocery store downstairs from my place.”


3- Taxi Directions in French



Continuer
“To continue”; “To keep going”
Continuez un peu, jusqu’au bout de la rue.
“Keep going a bit, until the end of the street.”
Plus loin
“Further”
Non, c’est plus loin sur cette avenue.
“No, it is further on this avenue.”
S’arrêter
“To stop”
Vous pouvez vous arrêter ici.
“You can stop here.”
Ralentir
“To slow down”
Vous pouvez ralentir un peu, s’il vous plaît ?
“Could you please slow down a bit?”


    → To learn more words and their pronunciation, check out our free vocabulary list on Position & Direction.


Plane cockpit

“Could you start going down? I live a few blocks from here!”



6. The French vs. Directions


Asking a random person for directions is like playing roulette. Sometimes, you’ll bump into another tourist who might very well know the surroundings. Or you’ll face a high-tech teenager, shocked at your inability to rely on a map app, or someone—like myself—who doesn’t know more than two or three street names in the city where they spent ten years.

1- The Lost Art of Knowing Street Names


Best case scenario? You’ll meet one of these old-timers who grew up without modern smartphones and don’t see the point in carrying a GPS outside of their car, if any. They’ve memorized the name of every single street, from center to suburb, and will be only too happy to share their nearly extinct knowledge with you.

Knowing the street names and the most optimized way to get from point A to point B without any GPS-driven help is definitely a matter of generation, and elderly French will be your best friends! Just don’t forget to address them respectfully, using your most humble Bonjour monsieur and Merci beaucoup.

2- I Don’t Know!


Basic Questions

What do people do when asked for directions to a place they don’t know? In some countries, they would simply admit they don’t know, but if you’re in one of the South-East Asian countries where saving face matters more than telling the truth, it’s more complicated. I once found myself helplessly wandering through the streets, looking for an embassy because every single local would describe me all kinds of random directions, only not to admit they didn’t have a clue.

In France, when people don’t know what you’re looking for, or aren’t sure how to describe the directions, they’ll simply tell you Je ne sais pas (“I don’t know”) or Aucune idée ! (“No idea!”) and it’s a blessing.

3- French Perception of Distances


Although cars are popular and as overused as in any wealthy country, the French still have the culture of walking, and it shows in their appreciation of distances.

On a trip abroad, I once asked for the nearest bakery and was told “Oh no, it’s way too far to walk there, you should take a taxi!” Having nothing but time, I walked there anyway and found it after five minutes of my long stride. In my personal perception of distances, it was absolutely within walking reach, but locals would take their bikes for shorter errands.

Most French wouldn’t take their cars for less than a kilometer and when they give you walking directions, keep this walking culture in mind. They won’t blink if you tell them you want to walk from the Eiffel Tower to Montmartre. Sure, go ahead, it’s just a one-hour walk!

Hikers Walking Across a Mountain

Typical French vacations. Better take your hiking poles!



7. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French


In this guide, you’ve learned everything about asking and giving directions in French, from the most common structures to situation-specific vocabulary, polite greetings, and map navigation. Did I forget any important word or phrase that you know? Do you feel ready to get lost in Paris and valiantly ask your way around the capital?

FrenchPod101 also has tons of vocabulary lists with audio recordings and free resources to boost your studies and keep your French learning fresh and entertaining!

Remember that you can also use our premium service, MyTeacher, to get personal one-on-one coaching and have your private teacher help you practice with directions and more. They’ll provide you with assignments and personalized exercises, and will record audio samples for you as well as review yours, to help improve your pronunciation.

Happy learning on FrenchPod101!

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How to Write a Resume in French – French CV Guide

Have you ever dreamed of living and working in France? If you’ve read the first part of this guide about How to Find Jobs in France, you already know why: It’s not just the elegant charm of the City of Love or the amazing cheesy meals of the Savoie. It’s also the numerous advantages of working for a French company and benefiting from our labor laws.

But how do you go about writing a resume in French or creating a French CV? 

In the first chapter, you’ve seen that there are many job opportunities for foreigners. You’ve also learned what kind of work you can find in France, and how to search for it using a wide range of job-hunting tools and resources. Now that you know how to find a job, let’s see how to get that job! 

This guide will go through everything you need to know to land your dream job, from the application process with a French resume, to the specifics of the job interview and the perks of the local working culture.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in French

1. How to Apply for a Job

Mug on a desk

J’aime mon travail. (“I love my job”)

1- Create Your French-Style Resume

The French resume is called CV for “Curriculum Vitæ” and doesn’t differ too much from its North American counterpart. But there are a few things you need to know to make it perfect! First, here’s a French CV example:


Raoul DUPONT (1)……………………………………………………………………….. (2)
raoul.dupont@frenchmail.fr

25 rue de la corniche 75001 Paris
+33 601010101

Guide Touristique Certifié – Trilingue (3)

__________ Expérience Professionnelle (4)
Juin 2012 – Décembre 2015 ………Conseiller Voyage – Belle-Aventure, Evry (France)
Janvier 2016 – Mai 2019 …………….Guide Touristique – CoolTrip, Montréal (Canada)

__________ Formation (5)
2015 – 2017 ………………………………………….MBA Tourisme International, Paris 8

__________ Compétences (6)
  • Trilingue : Français, Anglais, Russe
  • Notions d’Allemand, Espagnol et Japonais
  • Logiciel TripExpress 2.0
__________ Centres d’intérêt (7)
Voyage, photographie, écriture.
  • (1) Personal information

As you can see from this sample CV in French, all basic contact information goes on the top left corner. Note that the contact information in French resumes can vary from person to person, but these are the basics:

    • Your full name
    • Your age
      You’re allowed to give this information in France, but it’s not mandatory. As this is still a discriminating factor, I would recommend not including it.
    • Physical address

This could be omitted as well. In most cases, it doesn’t really make a difference whether you include it or not. But in some cases, it could work against you if, for example, you’re living remarkably far from the company you’re applying for.

    • Email address
    • Phone number

That’s it! No need to add your IQ, blood type, or astrological sign.

  • (2) Photo or no photo?

Unlike in other countries, it’s perfectly fine to put your photo on your French resume. You can smile, but keep it serious and professional, unless you’re applying in a specific work field where creativity is valued. If you have a photo you would like to use, this would be the place to put it.

However, it’s not mandatory and it’s better not to have a photo than to have a bad one!

  • (3) Give a title to your CV! 

This is often overlooked, but with more and more French companies going through resumes with automated search tools, it’s becoming important. It’s also the line that will stand out when your recruiter opens the resume. 

Ideally, the title of your resume should highlight the most important degree or skill of experience relevant to the job you’re trying to get. For instance, even if you’re a graduate programmer from a top-notch school, don’t make it your title if you’re looking for a job in real-estate!

Here are some examples:

Guide Touristique Certifié – Trilingue (Certified Tour Guide – Trilingual)

Assistant Commercial Immobilier (Real-estate Sales Assistant)

The usual list of sections in a French CV is as follows:

  • (4) Expérience Professionnelle (Work Experience) 

You can mention everything, but only add details when it’s relevant for the job.

  • (5) Formation (Education)
    List your degrees and certifications in chronological order (or reverse), with the years and cities/countries. You might want to put this section first if your work experience section seems short.
  • (6) Compétences (Skills)

The section for skills in French resumes is usually short and is divided into sections, such as Langues (Languages) or Informatique (IT). It’s also a good place to mention your Permis de conduire (Driver’s license).

  • (7) Centres d’intérêts (Personal interests)
    This is not as straightforward as you might think. If you have dangerous or notoriously time-consuming hobbies, better leave them out. I recommend including those that seem to fit with the job you’re applying for or the company’s values.

Take the time to customize your CV for the specific job and company, and of course, make it flawless and easy to read! You’ll find enormous amounts of resources online about how to write a perfect resume. 

Except for what I’ve mentioned above, it should apply to the French CV!

A resume on a desk

Make it flawless and easy to read!

2- The Subtle Art of Cover Letters

The French Lettre de motivation (Literally “Motivation letter,” or “Cover letter” in English) is a delicate exercise of balance. On one hand, it’s highly codified and somewhat artificial; on the other hand, it needs to feel genuine and original enough to catch your reader’s attention. But on a third hand, you can’t be too different, because it’s highly codified! 

Let’s have a look at the unavoidable classics of cover letters and let’s debunk some of the nonsense you might come across while researching about French cover letters online.

First, keep in mind that the French letter is almost never more than one page long.

It should look roughly like this:

Raoul DUPONT (1)
raoul.dupont@frenchmail.fr
+33 601010101
………………………………………………………………………………..MyDreamCompany
……………………………………………………………………………..34 rue des Croissants
…………………………………………………………………………………………75001 Paris

……………………………………………………………………………..A Lille, le 22/09/18 (2)
PJ : Curriculum Vitae (3)
Objet : Candidature au poste de Professeur d’Anglais (Ref #7854) (4)
Madame, Monsieur, (5)
Why am I contacting this company? (6)
What do I have to offer to this company? (7)
Why am I the perfect person for this position? (8)
Veuillez agréer, Madame, Monsieur, mes meilleures salutations. (9)
Raoul Dupont (10)
  • (1) Remind your reader who you are by reusing the personal information from your CV.
  • (2) Put the company name and address, followed by the date and where the present letter is written from.
  • (3) Remind what documents are attached to this letter (most likely your CV).
  • (4) Under Objet (Topic), be perfectly explicit about why you’re writing with a sentence such as Candidature au poste de ____ (Application for the position of ____) followed by the exact name of the position as mentioned in the job offer (if any). If there’s a reference code, you can add it there for extra clarity.
  • (5) If you know the name of your reader, you can use it here. For instance: Monsieur Fontaine, (Mister Fontaine,). Always use the last name (with the proper spelling!).

    Never use Cher Monsieur Fontaine, (Dear Mister Fontaine,). It’s not formal enough. And if you don’t know who’s going to read it, or have any doubts, go for the fool-proof: Madame, Monsieur, (Madam, Mister,).
Man handing someone a bunch of papers

Hold on! The perfect cover letter is only one page long.

Next comes the body of your letter. In France, it’s typically made of three paragraphs, each with a specific purpose:

  • (6) The first one is about your target company: Why are you applying? Why this specific company?

If you’re passionate about it, it’s time to explain why. If not, a bit of hypocrisy doesn’t hurt—but don’t go too heavy on the soft-soaping! Researching about the company will help you to avoid being too vague.

You can use sentences such as:

 Intégrer la société ___ au poste de ___ m’attire tout particulièrement pour ___. 

“Joining the ___ company in a position of ___ is especially tempting because ___.”

  • (7) The second paragraph is about you, and more specifically, what you have to offer. Sell yourself without sounding like a bombastic jerk! Always the delicate balance.

You can use sentences such as:

Ma formation en ___ m’a permis d’acquérir de nombreuses compétences en ___.

“During my studies in ___, I developed strong skills in ___.”

  • (8) The last paragraph explains why your personality and unique set of skills make you the perfect candidate for the job. This is where you outshine the competition by keeping the target company above any further temptation of self-glorification. Make it about what you can give them and how you can help them, not just about yourself.

It could include:

___ mettre mes compétences à votre service.

“___ to put my skills at your service.”

But really, there’s no template for this part. Be specific, be genuine, and don’t use empty words just because they sound good.

  • (9) The salutations section is trickier than it seems in a French letter, and you’ll read a lot of garbage about it online, ranging from old-fashioned or submissive to straight-up grammatically incorrect.

My personal favorites are:

Veuillez agréer, Madame, Monsieur, mes meilleures salutations.

Veuillez recevoir, Madame, Monsieur, mes respectueuses salutations.

“Please receive, Madam, Mister, my best / respectful salutations.”

  • (10) Sign here with your full name. If the letter is printed, I like to hand-sign it.

3- Professional Social Networks & Online Reputation

Although French employers aren’t as crazy about LinkedIn as North Americans, your online presence on such networks can absolutely be a plus! The most popular in France are:

  • LinkedIn: A massive network of professionals where you can put your resume, join communities,  and follow the careers of your contacts. Depending on your profile, you may get contacted directly by employers or Headhunters.
  • Viadeo – France: The French cousin of LinkedIn, and although not as popular, it’s preferred by some companies.

Once you have a bright and shiny profile with a stunning photo, it doesn’t hurt to add a link on your resume!

Many yellow figures on a graphic

Réseau social professionnel (“Professional social network”)

If you’re not already registered on one of these networks, take a moment to consider whether it makes sense in the context of your job search. Small local businesses shouldn’t care too much about it, while big corporations will appreciate the extra mile.

One last note: Be careful with what you publicly publish on social networks. More and more frequently, French recruiters are browsing social media to get a better idea of the applicants; thus, displaying controversial opinions or outrageous photos might be unwise!

2. Interviewing for a Job in France

Jobs

You’ve sent a beautiful French-style CV attached to an elegant Lettre de motivation (Cover letter) and you got an appointment to a job interview? Well done! The hardest part is behind you, but you still have to capitalize on your success and land the job! Here’s some information on how to interview in French with prospective employers. 

1- Research! Knowledge is Power

The first thing to do before a job interview in French is to do some serious homework. This is as true in France as it is in any country. Recruiters will gauge your enthusiasm and interest for the company just as much as they will your capacity to fill the position.

  • Research thoroughly about the company. Find out about its history, how it operates, its current contacts, and general health. Anything you find out might come in handy!
  • Research about the position. This involves reading the job offer about a hundred times, researching about professionals who are assuming a similar role on professional social networks, and finding out about the average salary.
  • Research about your recruiter: This is the person you’re about to meet. You don’t want to be a Facebook stalker and compliment him on his beautiful wife, but being aware of his position and role within the company is a plus.

2- How to Ace Your French Job Interview

Assuming that you already know how to conduct a job interview, I’ll mainly cover the specifics of the French culture when it comes to meeting a recruiter on a typical job interview.

1. Greetings – Keep it Formal and Kiss-free!

I know we kiss a lot in France! We do La bise to our friends and family, and during many casual (or even professional!) situations. But you should, under no circumstances, initiate a kiss toward a recruiter during a job interview. Instead, go for a firm handshake, with a smile and confident eye contact.

The usual greetings for a job interview are:

  • Bonjour. (Good day)
  • Bonjour Monsieur. or Bonjour Madame. (Good day mister or madam)
  • Bonjour Monsieur Fontaine. or Bonjour Madame Fontaine., (Using their last name after the greeting)

Pick one depending on the meeting’s level of formality. If your recruiter seems very relaxed and friendly, is wearing an old t-shirt, and opens the conversation on a first name basis, Bonjour Monsieur may be too uptight.

Two office workers shaking hands

You can’t go wrong with a firm handshake.

2. Tu or Vous? Follow Their Lead

In French, you can address a person with one of two types of “you.” Tu is the casual “you” while Vous is for formal and professional encounters.

In the context of a job interview, always open with Vous. Then, if your interlocutor wants to switch to Tu, simply follow their lead. But most interviews are conducted with the Vous from start to finish.

Some examples are:

  • Comment allez-vous ? (How are you doing?)
  • Ravi de vous rencontrer. (Nice to meet you.)

3. Classic French Questions & Answers

Job interview phrases

Unlike other countries, where you can warm up with a bit of small talk, French recruiters usually have a no-chit-chat policy. They’ll cut straight to the chase and start asking questions. 

Also, be prepared to be asked about what you may consider to be personal topics, such as your marital status, kids, or hobbies. This is perfectly acceptable in France!

Here are some of the most common questions asked during a job interview, so you can prepare and think about how to answer them:

  • Parlez-moi de votre expérience professionnelle.
    “Tell me about your job history.”
  • Parlez moi de vos études.
    “Tell me about your studies.”
    Quels sont vos diplômes ?
    “What degrees do you have?”
    Quel est votre parcours scolaire?
    “What is your educational background?”
  • Que savez-vous sur notre entreprise ?
    “What do you know about our company?”
  • Pourquoi pensez-vous être un bon candidat pour ce poste ?

“What makes you think you are a good fit for this position?”

  • Pourquoi pensez-vous que nous devrions vous embaucher ?
    “Why do you think we should hire you?”

  • Quelles langues parlez-vous ?
    “Which languages do you speak?”
    Quel est votre niveau en Anglais ?
    “What is your level in English?”
    Parlez-vous couramment Anglais ?
    “Are you fluent in English?”
  • Quand seriez vous disponible pour commencer ?
    “When could you start working with us?”
  • Quelles sont vos prétentions salariales ?
“What kind of salary are you expecting?”

“What kind of salary are you expecting?”

  • Quelles sont vos forces ? Votre principal défaut ?
    “What are your strengths? Your biggest flaw?”
  • Pourquoi avez-vous quitté votre dernier emploi ?
    “Why did you leave your previous job?”
    Pourquoi souhaitez-vous quitter votre employeur actuel ?
    “Why do you wish to leave your current employer?”
Interviewer and interviewee

Quels sont vos diplômes ? (“What degrees do you have?”)

3. French Work Culture

1- A Strong Work Ethic

The French work culture is by no means perfect, but I want to highlight some of its strengths as well as the kind of qualities you’ll have to develop if you want to thrive in this environment.

  • French employees have a reputation for being hard workers. You may smile after reading about our avalanche of days off and our 35-hour weeks, but you want to make the best of these hours. You want to end up being more productive than you would be if you were sleep-working sixty hours a week while ruminating on your unpaid overtime.
  • Autonomy and creativity are highly regarded qualities in a French company. You’re expected to be technically proficient and to quickly learn how to handle yourself without constant supervision. Collective work is still a thing, but your individual performance is more important than in some other countries.
  • Having a critical mind isn’t seen as an annoying flaw of character, but as an important asset. It’s perfectly fine, and even encouraged, to comment and criticize the work and ideas of your colleagues as long as you’re bringing value to the table. This critique-based approach can put you off if you’re used to more agreeable work cultures, but it’s for the greater good!

2- A Friendly Work Environment

Although very vocal with their critiques, French workers tend to keep their work environment as friendly and relaxed as possible. It’s not to say that you can’t end up in horrible, hostile work environments, as it happens in any country; but overall, the French are very relational with their peers. 

You’re likely to develop strong bonds with your coworkers that extend way beyond your workplace and last much longer than your employment period.

  • Lunchtime is serious business! No, really. Lunchtime in the middle of your work day can easily take up to two hours, but it’s not just casual conversation and joyful wine-tasting: Many work-related discussions happen over lunch, and business deals are frequently signed over a cheese platter!
    Don’t get me wrong. French lunches ALSO have casual conversations and glassfulls of wine. Hard to go back to your quick sandwich lunch after that.
  • After-hours mingling also takes an important part in the workplace social life of many companies. It’s common to go for a drink after a hard day of labor, and one beer leading to the next, you might spend more time with your coworkers than with your spouse!
People looking at a laptop

Connecting with your colleagues.

4. How FrenchPod101.com Can Help You Get a Job in France

In this guide, you’ve learned how to expertly craft your French CV and cover letter in order to apply for a job in France, as well as how to handle yourself during the job interview. Do you feel ready to go job-hunting and make friends in your new workplace? How about to create a French CV and interview with your potential employer?

FrenchPod101.com has tons of free vocabulary lists with audio recordings that can help you prepare for your interview:

And much more!

If your job interview is conducted in French (and in most cases, it will be), the best way to maximize your chances of landing the job is to carefully prepare yourself for the interview.

A good exercise is to ask yourself the typical questions for a French job interview and try to write down your answers using all of the free resources that you can find on FrenchPod101. It will make you much more confident when it comes time for your interview!

Remember that you can also use our premium service, MyTeacher, to get personal one-on-one coaching and have your private teacher check your answers to make them perfect!

100 Must-Know French Nouns

Thumbnail Do you know that the sun, a world, or a spider are guys, while moons, tables, and legs are girls? And these are only a few family-friendly examples of the French nouns genders’ oddity. Wait until you learn about the male and female genital words and their counter-intuitive genders.

Figuring out which are the feminine nouns in French is one of the trickiest aspects of the language, and so is the formation of plural nouns, but bear with me for a little while and you’ll learn a collection of useful tricks to help you wrap your head around it!

In this guide, you’ll find a list of the 100 most common and useful French nouns and how to use them. For each of these words, I’ve included the gender, plural form, translation, and example sentences. If you manage to memorize most of the items on this French nouns list, you’ll be pretty far along on your way to talking about a great many things!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in French Table of Contents
  1. Gender and Plural
  2. About Time
  3. Places
  4. Technology & Internet
  5. Home, Sweet Home
  6. City & Transports
  7. Family & Friends
  8. Body Parts
  9. Food & Utensils
  10. Occupation
  11. Clothing Items
  12. Bonus: Communication
  13. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French


1. Gender and Plural

Scattered Word Magnets

Le vocabulaire (“Vocabulary”)

1- How do you know if a French word is masculine or feminine?

French nouns are either masculine or feminine.

For instance, le soleil (“the sun”) is masculine, while la lune (“the moon”) is feminine.

The question of why une araignée (“a spider”) is female and un cafard (“a cockroach”) is male doesn’t matter as much as: How do I know which gender it is?

Luckily, it’s generally quite straightforward, and based on the final letters of a word, you can guess its gender. The rule isn’t entirely accurate, but as you get used to these typical masculine and feminine endings, you’ll be able to make good guesses.

      Usually feminine endings:
      Most words ending in -e or -ion
      • Une lune; une année; une semaine
      • Une nation; une division
      Except words ending in -age, -ege, , -isme
      Usually masculine endings:
      Words ending in -age, -ege, , -isme

      + Everything else.
      • Un mariage; un été
      • Un jour; un parc; un nain
      Should you learn all of these endings by heart? I don’t believe so.
      1. It would be a tedious and super-boring process.
      2. This is not how native speakers learn the words’ genders.


      If you’re wondering how to remember French nouns’ gender, I instead encourage you to ALWAYS learn new nouns with their article.
      • Soleil Un soleil (“A sun”)
      • Lune Une lune (“A moon”)


      You can also memorize them with a definite article. It’s just a matter of preference.
      • Le soleil (“The sun”)
      • La lune (“The moon”)
      Man and Woman Arguing

      The gender war is declared.

      2- How to make French nouns plural

      For most nouns, simply add an -s at the end of the word.
      • Un an -> des ans
      • Un jour -> des jours


      Nouns ending in -au become -aux.
      • Un bateau -> des bateaux


      Nouns ending in -ou usually become -ous, but some take a -oux.
      • Un fou -> des fous
      • Un bijou -> des bijoux


      Nouns ending in -al become -aux.
      • Un animal -> des animaux


      Finally, nouns ending in -s, -x, or -z are invariable.
      • Une souris -> des souris
      • Un lynx -> des lynx
      • Un nez -> des nez


      Now that we’ve learned how to determine the gender of French nouns and how to make them plural, let’s move on to our 100 French nouns list!

      2. About Time

      Nouns 1
      Un an; des ans
      “Year”

      Une année; des années
      “Year”
      Nous vivons ici depuis dix ans.
      “We have been living here for ten years.”

      Nous vivons ici depuis plusieurs années.
      “We have been living here for several years.”
      An is mainly used when there is a number involved:
      • J’ai 35 ans. (“I’m 35 years old.”)
      • Trois fois par an (“Three times per year”)
      Année is used in most other cases:
      • Je voyage chaque année. (“I travel every year.”)
      • L’année dernière, j’ai arrêté de fumer. (“Last year, I stopped smoking.”)
      Une semaine; des semaines
      “Week”

      A la semaine prochaine !
      “See you next week!”
      Un mois; des mois
      “Month”
      Le mois de juillet est souvent ensoleillé.
      “The month of July is often sunny.”
      Un jour; des jours
      “Day”
      Je viendrai dans trois jours.
      “I will come in three days.”
      Une heure; des heures
      “Hour”
      Ce film dure trois heures.
      “This movie is three hours long.”
      Quick Tip: How to tell time?

      In France, you can use the twelve- or twenty-four-hour system.
      • Quelle heure est-il ? (“What time is it?”)
      • Il est seize heures et demi. (“It is 4:30 PM.” Literally: “It is 16 and half.”)
      • Il est huit heures trente cinq. (“It is 8:35.”)
      Une minute; des minutes
      “Minute”
      Laisse moi deux minutes et on y va !
      “Give me two minutes and let’s go!”
      Un temps; des temps
      “Time”
      Je n’ai pas le temps.
      “I don’t have the time.”

        → Make sure to visit our full article about Time as well as our vocabulary list on Talking About Time, with audio recordings to practice your pronunciation. It’s freely available on FrenchPod101!


      Lots of Clocks

      Une question de temps (“A matter of time”)

      3. Places



      Un monde; des mondes
      “World”
      La plus belle plage du monde.
      “The most beautiful beach in the world.”
      Un pays; des pays
      “Country”

      Tu as visité de nombreux pays.
      “You have visited many countries.”
      Un endroit; des endroits
      “Place”
      J’adore cet endroit !
      “I love this place!”
      In Quebec, where French is a bit different, a place is une place.
      • Montréal est un endroit une place que j’aime beaucoup
        “Montreal is a place that I like very much.”
      In France, une place means “a square,” as in La place centrale (“The main square”).
      Une région; des régions
      “Region”
      C’est le plat typique de ma région.
      “This is the typical dish of my region.”
      Une mer; des mers
      “Sea”
      La mer du nord est un peu froide.
      “The northern sea is a bit cold.”
      Une forêt; des forêts
      “Forest”
      Il s’est perdu dans la forêt.
      “He got lost in the forest.”
      Une montagne; des montagnes
      “Mountain”
      Des vacances à la montagne
      “Mountain vacations”
      Un magasin; des magasins
      “Shop”
      Tu peux en acheter dans ce magasin.
      “You can buy some in this shop.”
      Une banque; des banques
      “Bank”
      J’ai besoin de retirer de l’argent à la banque.
      “I need to withdraw some cash at the bank.”
      Un parc; des parcs
      “Park”
      On se retrouve dans le parc ?
      “Shall we meet in the park?”

        → Learn more about how to navigate French cities with our free vocabulary list on places Around Town.


      4. Technology & Internet

      Nouns 2
      Un téléphone; des téléphones
      “Phone”
      Je te donne mon numéro de téléphone.
      “I’ll give you my phone number.”
      Un portable; des portables
      “Mobile phone”
      Tu me donnes ton numéro de portable ?
      “Can you give me your mobile phone number?”
      Portable VS. Mobile VS. Laptop

      A common source of confusion, even among natives, is the word portable meaning “mobile phone” and “laptop.”

      One way to avoid the confusion is to use un mobile or un smartphone instead of un portable when talking about mobile phones. Younger generations also tend to use laptop instead of portable.

      To be fair, it’s usually easy to guess from the context.
      Un ordinateur; des ordinateurs
      “Computer”
      Mon ordinateur est un PC.
      “My computer is a PC.”
      Fun fact: PC is also the acronym for the French communist party: Parti Communiste.
      Is there any risk of ever confusing these two? I wouldn’t bet on it.
      Une tablette; des tablettes
      “Tablet”
      Tu as installé l’app sur ta tablette ?
      “Did you install the app on your tablet?”
      Une télé; des télés
      “TV”
      Il y a quoi à la télé, ce soir ?
      “What’s on TV tonight?”
      Télévision, Télé, or TV?

      While Télévision is the full word, it’s rarely used in conversations; Télé is far more popular. TV is mainly used in writing.

      Un chargeur,;des chargeurs
      “Charger”
      Je peux emprunter ton chargeur ?
      “Can I borrow your charger?”
      Internet
      “Internet”
      On n’a pas internet, dans ce petit village.
      “We don’t have internet in this small village.”
      Internet (with a capital “I”), internet, or l’internet?

      Short answer: Whatever you like!

      (But use “internet” if you wanna sound cool. L’internet is for your grandpa.)

      Long answer: According to the Académie Française (official patron of the French language), you can use both. However, there was an attempt in 2016 at the national assembly to officialize l’internet over “internet.” Thank goodness, the bill didn’t pass.
      Un site web; des sites web
      “A website”
      On ira voir sur le site web de la mairie.
      “We’ll check on the city hall’s website.”
      Site or Site web? Whichever.
      • On ira voir sur le site de la mairie.
        “We’ll check on the city hall’s website.”
      Un compte; des comptes
      “Account”
      Tu as un compte Skype ?
      “Do you have a Skype account?”
      Un mot de passe; des mots de passe
      “Password”
      Je dois réinitialiser mon mot de passe.
      “I need to reset my password.”
      How do you say “login?”
      We often say login, but you can equally say identifiant.
      Un fichier; des fichiers
      “File”
      J’ai copié les fichiers sur ma clef USB.
      “I copied the files on my USB drive.”
      Un logiciel; des logiciels
      “Software”
      Tu peux installer ce logiciel.
      “You can install this software.”

        → Appliances and technology are a vast topic and I’m just scratching the surface here! Don’t miss any words with our free vocabulary lists on Home Appliances, Technology, and the Internet.

      A Mobile Phone being Used in Front of a Laptop

      La technologie (“Technology”)

      5. Home, Sweet Home


      Une maison; des maisons
      “House”; “Home”
      On rentre à la maison.
      “We’re going home.”
      Une porte; des portes
      “Door”
      La première porte à gauche
      “The first door on the left”
      Une fenêtre; des fenêtres
      “Window”
      Les cambrioleurs ont cassé une fenêtre.
      “Burglars have broken a window.”
      Un frigo; des frigos
      “A fridge”
      Ne mettez jamais de vin rouge au frigo !
      “Don’t ever put red wine in the fridge!”
      Ideally, before and after it has been opened, you should keep it out of light and at room temperature.
      Une armoire; des armoires
      “Closet”
      On a besoin d’une nouvelle armoire.
      “We need a new closet.”
      Une pièce; des pièces
      “Room”
      Ce serait bien d’avoir une pièce en plus.
      “It would be nice to have one more room.”
      Une cuisine; des cuisines
      “Kitchen”
      N’oublie pas d’aérer la cuisine.
      “Don’t forget to ventilate the kitchen.”
      Cuisine also means…well, “Cuisine.” #CaptainObvious
      • J’aime la cuisine indienne. 
        “I love Indian cuisine.”
      Un salon; des salons
      “Living room”
      On va prendre l’apéro dans le salon.
      “We’ll take the aperitif in the living room.”
      Une chambre; des chambres
      “Bedroom”
      Ma chambre a un plafond intéressant.
      “My bedroom has an interesting ceiling.”
      Des toilettes (invariable)
      “Toilets”
      Où sont les toilettes ?
      “Where are the toilets?”
      We also use WC, for “water closet.”
      Une salle de bain; des salles de bain
      “Bathroom”
      Il y a une autre salle de bain à l’étage.
      “There is another bathroom upstairs.”


      6. City & Transports

      Nouns 3
      Une voiture; des voitures
      “Car”
      J’ai vendu ma voiture.
      “I’ve sold my car.”
      Un bus; des bus
      “Bus”
      Je prends souvent le bus.
      “I often take the bus.”
      Un train; des trains
      “Train”
      Je voyage parfois en train.
      “I sometimes travel by train.”
      Un avion; des avions
      “Plane”
      J’évite surtout de prendre l’avion.
      “I especially avoid taking planes.”
      Un taxi; des taxis
      “Taxi”; “Cab”
      Tu peux m’appeler un taxi ?
      “Can you call me a cab?”
      Un vélo; des vélos
      “Bicycle”
      Un vélo de course.
      “A racing bicycle.”
      Vélo is short for vélocipède, a word so popular that I learned about it two minutes ago.
      Une ville; des villes
      “City”; “Town”
      On se promène en ville.
      “We’re strolling in town.”
      Une rue; des rues
      “Street”
      Une rue piétonne
      “A walking street”
      Une avenue; des avenues
      “Avenue”
      L’avenue principale
      “The main avenue”
      Une route; des routes
      “Road”
      Les routes de campagne sont tranquilles.
      “Countryside roads are quiet.”
      A Bus

      Les transports en commun (“Public transports”)

      7. Family & Friends


      Une mère; des mères
      “Mother”

      Aujourd’hui, c’est la fête des mères.
      “Today is Mother’s Day.”
      Ma maman 
      “My mom”
      Un père; des pères
      “Father”
      Luke, je suis ton père.
      “Luke, I am your father.”
      Mon papa 
      “My dad”
      Une femme; des femmes
      “Wife” (literally: “Woman”)
      Ma femme a toujours raison.
      “My wife is always right.”
      You can also say Mon épouse (formal) or Ma conjointe (super-formal).
      Un mari; des maris
      “Husband”
      Son mari est enseignant.
      “Her husband is a teacher.”
      You can also say Mon époux (formal) or Mon conjoint (super-formal).
      Un frère; des frères
      “Brother”
      Il t’aime comme un frère.
      “He loves you like a brother.”
      Une soeur; des soeurs
      “Sister”
      J’ai deux soeurs et un frère.
      “I have two sisters and one brother.”
      Une famille; des familles
      “Family”
      Je passe Noël avec ma famille.
      “I spend Christmas with my family.”
      You can also use un parent/des parents, but don’t confuse mon parent (“my relative”) and mes parents (“my parents”).

      Un parent (“a relative”) or des parents (“relatives”) both refer to relatives of any kind, while mes parents (possessive plural) means: “my parents” (mom and dad).
      • Je vais voir mes parents. 
        “I’m going to see my parents.”

      • J’ai des parents dans la région. 
        “I have relatives in the region.”
      Une copine; des copines
      “Girlfriend”

      Un copain; des copains
      “Boyfriend”

      Je vais au cinéma avec ma copine.
      “I’m going to the cinema with my girlfriend.”

      Laisse tomber, j’ai un copain.
      “Let it go, I have a boyfriend.”
      The word copain / copine also means “buddy.” It depends on the context, but it can be confusing even for locals. (Just like when American women talk about their “girlfriends.”)

      The general rule is:
      • When you say un copain, it means “a buddy” or “a pal.”
      • When you say mon copain, it means “my boyfriend.”
      Un fils; des fils
      “Son”

      Nous sommes les fils de la Terre.
      “We are the sons of the Earth.”
      Une fille; des filles
      “Daughter” (Literally: “Girl”)
      Ma fille aînée.
      “My elder daughter.”
      Un ami; des amis
      “Friend”
      Tu es mon meilleur ami.
      “You’re my best friend.”

        → To read more about the rest of the family, check out our free vocabulary list on Family Members. And be sure not to miss our special article about The French Family to learn everything on this important topic, from the vocabulary to the cultural aspect of it!

      8. Body Parts


      Une tête; des têtes
      “Head”
      Un chasseur de têtes
      “A headhunter”
      Un oeil; des yeux
      “Eye”
      Tu as de très beaux yeux.
      “You have very beautiful eyes.”
      Une bouche; des bouches
      “Mouth”
      Ouvre la bouche.
      “Open your mouth.”
      Un nez; des nez
      “Nose”
      Un piercing au nez.
      “A nose piercing.”
      The French don’t stand toe to toe, but nose to nose.
      • Il se trouve nez à nez avec elle. 
        “He’s standing toe to toe with her.”
      However, in French, this expression doesn’t necessarily involve a conflict or competition. It means that you unexpectedly end up right in front of that person.
      Un cheveu; des cheveux
      “Hair”
      Elle a les cheveux courts.
      “She has short hair.”
      Un bras; des bras
      “Arm”
      Viens dans mes bras.
      “Come into my arms.”
      Une main; des mains
      “Hand”
      Les mains en l’air !
      “Put your hands in the air!”
      The French don’t wear their heart on their sleeve; they have it on their hand.
      • Il a le coeur sur la main. 
        “He’s wearing his heart on his sleeve.”
      Une jambe; des jambes
      “Leg”
      Je me suis cassé la jambe.
      “I broke my leg.”
      Un pied; des pieds
      “Foot”
      J’ai déjà un pied dans la tombe.
      “I already have one foot in the grave.”
      In France, don’t put your foot in your mouth; put it in the dish.
      • J’ai mis les pieds dans le plat. 
        “I put my foot in my mouth.”

        → Practice your French anatomy by reviewing our free vocabulary list on Body Parts, with audio recordings to improve your pronunciation!

      Anatomical Model of a Human

      L’anatomie (“Anatomy”)

      9. Food & Utensils


      Un couteau; des couteaux
      “Knife”
      Un couteau à fromage
      “A cheese knife”
      Une fourchette; des fourchettes
      “Fork”
      J’ai besoin d’une plus grande fourchette.
      “I need a bigger fork.”
      Une cuillère; des cuillères
      “Spoon”
      Une cuillère à soupe d’huile
      “A tablespoon of oil”
      Une assiette; des assiettes
      “Plate”
      Une assiette de charcuterie
      “A plate of cold cuts”
      Un verre; des verres
      “Glass”
      Tu mérites un verre de vin.
      “You deserve a glass of wine.”
      Une eau; des eaux
      “Water”
      Je voudrais une carafe d’eau, s’il vous plait.
      “I would like a jug of water, please.”
      Un vin; des vins
      “Wine”
      Une cave à vin
      “A wine cellar”
      Un fruit; des fruits
      “Fruit”
      Un jus de fruit
      “A fruit juice”
      Un légume; des légumes
      “Vegetable”
      Je mange des légumes une fois par semaine.
      “I eat vegetables once a week.”
      Une viande; des viandes
      “Meat”
      Viande ou poisson ?
      “Meat or fish?”


      10. Occupation


      Nouns 4
      Un étudiant; des étudiants
      “Student”
      C’est un très bon étudiant.
      “He’s a very good student.”

      Un docteur; des docteurs
      “Doctor”; “Physician”
      Vous avez besoin d’une ordonnance du médecin.
      “You need a doctor’s prescription.”
      The most common word for “physician” is médecin.
      Un policier; des policiers
      “Police officer”
      Mon frère est policier.
      “My brother is a police officer.”
      Un professeur; des professeurs
      “Teacher”
      Je veux devenir professeur de Russe.
      “I want to be a Russian teacher.”
      Un avocat; des avocats
      “Lawyer”
      Je ne parlerai pas sans mon avocat.
      “I will not talk without my lawyer.”
      Avocat also means “Avocado.” Any risk of confusion? Not sure.
      • Je ne parlerai pas sans mon avocat. 
        “I will not talk without my avocado.”
      Un serveur; des serveurs
      “Waiter”
      La serveuse a pris notre commande.
      “The waitress has taken our order.”

        → Find your profession and your friends’ jobs on our free vocabulary lists: Jobs and Work. We also have a complete article on How to Find Jobs in France. Check it out!

      Group of People with Different Jobs

      Quelle est votre profession? (“What is your profession?”)

      11. Clothing Items


      Un pantalon; des pantalons
      “Pants”
      Un pantalon en cuir
      “Leather pants”
      Un pull; des pulls
      “Sweater”
      Un pull en laine
      “A wool sweater”
      Un T-shirt; des T-shirts
      “T-shirt”
      J’enfile un T-shirt propre.
      “I’m putting a clean T-shirt on.”
      Une chemise; des chemises
      “Shirt”
      Enlève ta chemise.
      “Take off your shirt.”
      Un manteau; des manteaux
      “Coat”
      J’ai laissé mon manteau dans la voiture.
      “I’ve left my coat in the car.”
      Une chaussette; des chaussettes
      “Sock”
      Mes chaussettes rouges et jaunes
      “My red-and-yellow socks”
      Une robe; des robes
      “Dress”
      Une robe en soie
      “A silk dress”
      Une chaussure; des chaussures
      “Shoe”
      Des chaussures de randonnée
      “Hiking shoes”


      12. Bonus: Communication


      Une question; des questions
      “Question”
      C’était une question rhétorique.
      “It was a rhetorical question.”
      Une réponse; des réponses
      “Answer”
      J’exige des réponses !
      “I demand answers!”
      Un mot; des mots
      “Word”
      Je ne trouve pas les mots.
      “I can’t find the words.”
      Une phrase; des phrases
      “Sentence”
      Je ne comprends pas cette phrase.
      “I don’t understand this sentence.”
      Une idée; des idées
      “Idea”
      C’est une très bonne idée !
      “This is a very good idea!”

      13. How FrenchPod101 Can Help You Learn More French


      In this French nouns lesson and guide, you’ve learned everything there is to know about French nouns, from the feminine nouns in French to the rules of forming plurals. You’ve also learned the key French nouns with our extensive noun list.

      Did we forget any important noun that you know? Do you feel ready to explore new conversation topics with your French friends, using everything you’ve learned today?

      A good way to practice the words on our basic French nouns list is to start simple, then add more flavor with adjectives.

      Adding adjectives to common French nouns will also help you remember the nouns’ gender, as many French adjectives have different forms in feminine or masculine:
      • Une pomme (“An apple”)
      • Une pomme verte (“A green apple”)


      Make sure to explore FrenchPod101, as it has plenty of free resources for you to practice your grammar and learn new words. Our vocabulary lists are also a great way to revisit the words and learn their pronunciation.

      Remember that you can also use our premium service, MyTeacher, to get personal one-on-one coaching. Practice using French nouns with your private teacher so they can give you personalized feedback and advice, and help you with your pronunciation.

      Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in French About the Author: Born and bred in the rainy north of France, Cyril Danon has been bouncing off various jobs before he left everything behind to wander around the wonders of the World. Now, after quenching his wanderlust for the last few years, he’s eager to share his passion for languages.

      Jeter Des Fleurs – French Compliments Guide

      Thumbnail

      Jeter des fleurs à quelqu’un. (“To compliment someone.” Or literally: “To throw flowers at someone.” )

      Ever wonder how to compliment a guy in French or give your compliments to the chef after a delicious meal? If you haven’t heard compliments in French before, it may be because the French don’t do this much and tend to keep their praise a bit too much to themselves.

      When I traveled to Japan with a bunch of French friends, we were stunned at how people would praise us for everything we were doing, laugh at our most wonky jokes, and compliment us at every corner on our accents, clothes, or even our choices of drinks. People would strongly react with round eyes, laughter, and what seemed to me like a general tendency to exaggerate their feelings.

      I got a similar impression later about Americans, then about Colombians, and it got me thinking: Are we, Europeans, such emotionless logs, sitting in silence with a straight face and dead eyes, that we are unable to see beauty and excitement in the smallest of things like our foreign counterparts do? How deep does this phlegm of ours go?

      The French are known to be sparing with their compliments, but they usually mean every single word when they do give one. You might not get much praise from them, but when you do, you’ll know it means something and it’s not overacted. It will convey just the level of enthusiasm they think it deserves, or probably less because we can also be emotionless logs. But don’t hold it against us!

      Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in French
      Table of Contents

      1. Good Job!
      2. Complimenting Someone’s Look
      3. Complimenting the Mind
      4. This is Amazing!
      5. What Comes After a Compliment
      6. Compliments and the French Culture of Seduction
      7. Le Mot De La Fin

      1. Good Job!

      Compliments

      One situation where you’d compliment someone is to praise them for doing a good job on something.

      Whether you’re at work or home, a job well done deserves some appreciation. Although more reserved than some in this department, your French colleagues or friends shouldn’t fail to reward the quality of your work with some nice words.

      Here are some common French compliments for a job well done:

      • Bien joué ! (“Well done!” Literally: “Well played!” )
      • Bon travail. (“Good work.” )
      • C’est du bon boulot. / C’est du bon travail. (“It’s good work.” )
      • Excellent travail. (“Excellent work.” )

      And here’s how to compliment them on their awards or achievements:

      • Félicitations ! (“Congratulations!” )
      • Toutes mes félicitations. (“My congratulations.” )
      • Tu l’as bien mérité ! (“You’ve earned it!” or “You deserve it!” )

      You don’t have to blindly follow the average French mindset. I’m personally trying to follow Dale Carnegie’s precept: “Be hearty in your approbation and lavish in your praise.” By praising whenever you can, even for small wins, you’ll make a strong impression on the French people you’re socializing with, as they’ll get more appreciation from you than they’d expect.

      A Businesswoman Giving a Thumbs-up Sign

      Bon travail ! (“Good work!” )

      2. Complimenting Someone’s Look

      If there’s one situation where the French don’t keep their tongue in their pocket, it’s when it comes to flirting, seduction, or praising their partner. Whether seeking pleasure or romance, this is when we could actually over-express our feelings and get carried away.

      For now, let’s be superficial and see how to compliment someone in French for their good looks:

      • Tu es beau. (“You are handsome.” ) [Male]
      • Tu es belle. (“You are beautiful.” ) [Female]

      Don’t forget that French adjectives need to agree with the subject. In most cases, the adjective’s ending will simply change, as in:

      • Tu es charmant. (“You are charming.” ) [Male]
      • Tu es charmante. (“You are charming.” ) [Female]

      But there are some cases, such as with beau and belle, where the two words are different.

        → You can find more on adjectives and how they work in our Complete Guide to French Adjectives on FrenchPod101.com.

      With the same structure, you can make many more compliments:

      • Tu es magnifique / superbe / élégant(e) / classe.
        (“Wonderful,” “Superb,” “Elegant,” “Classy” )

      We could go on for quite some time!

      These are very general compliments, so let’s get more specific:

      • Tu as de beaux yeux. (“You have beautiful eyes.” )
      • Tu as de beaux cheveux. (“You have beautiful hair.” )
      • Tu as de belles mains. (“You have beautiful hands.” )

      Technically, you can compliment on whatever you want, but some body parts are more popular targets and complimenting someone on their elbows or earlobes might raise a few eyebrows. Don’t let that keep you from doing it, though, if you ever meet someone whose amazing elbows leave you speechless!

      It’s always nice to be complimented on your body, but unless it’s aimed at your hard-earned muscles or surgically fixed nose, chances are you haven’t done anything to deserve the praise. What about when we switch to something else?

      • J’aime bien tes chaussures. (“I like your shoes.” )
      • J’aime beaucoup ton maquillage. (“I really like your makeup.” )
      • J’adore ta robe ! (“I love your dress!” )
      • Ce chapeau te va très bien. (“This hat suits you very well.” )
      • Tes lunettes sont super cool ! (“Your glasses are super-cool!” )
      • Je veux le même t-shirt ! (“I want the same T-shirt!” )

      Young and middle-aged French men are wearing lots of printed T-shirts where they can display their favorite comic characters, movie posters, video game artwork, as well as countless pop culture references. For example, if I’m wearing my Godzilla T-shirt and one of my coworkers comments on it with a subtle reference or clever remark, it instantly creates a connection, as we’re bonding over our common tastes in entertainment.

      A Cat with Clothes, a Wig, and a Beard

      Tu as une très belle barbe. (“You have a very beautiful beard.” )

      3. Complimenting the Mind

      Enough with the superficial compliments! Sure, everyone likes to be appreciated for their appearance, but we also want our minds to be praised! Let’s see some of the best French compliments regarding someone’s intellect or skills.

      Tu es intelligent. (“You’re intelligent.” )
      Tu es malin / futé. (“You’re smart / clever.” )

      There are many other words you can use, such as:

      • Intéressant (“Interesting” )
      • Perspicace (“Insightful” )
      • Drôle (“Funny” )
      • Cultivé (“Cultured” )
      • Gentil (“Kind” )
      • Sympa (“Nice” )
      • Adorable (“Adorable” )

      You can also compliment people on their skills with simple structures like:

      Tu _____ bien. (“You ____ well.” )

      • Tu chantes bien. (“You sing well.” )
      • Tu écris assez bien. (“You write rather well.” )
      • Tu cuisines très bien. (“You cook very well.” )
      • Tu dessines vraiment bien. (“You draw really well.” )

      Tu as une bonne / belle ______. (“You have a good / beautiful ____.” )

      • Tu as une bonne conduite. (“You have a good driving style.” )
      • Tu as un bon style. (“You have a good style.” )
      • Tu as une belle écriture. (“You have beautiful writing.” )

      An Old Couple Dancing Together at a Party

      Tu danses bien ! (“You’re a good dancer!” )

      4. This is Amazing!

      When you compliment a thing, you’re often indirectly praising a person. When you’re in awe of the food, you’re praising the cook; when you fall in love with a song, all credit goes to the artist.

      Here are the most useful words and sentences to share that you like something:

      • C’est bien. (“It’s good.” )
      • C’est bon. (“It’s good.” Mainly used to mean “it tastes good” or “it feels good.” )
      • C’est magnifique. (“It’s wonderful.” )
      • C’est magique ! (“It’s magical!” )
      • C’est intéressant / passionnant / divertissant. (“It’s interesting / fascinating / entertaining.” )

      Don’t leave the cook hanging. Let’s see more French compliments for food:

      • C’était très bon. (“It was very good.” )
      • C’est délicieux. (“It’s delicious.” )
      • C’est vraiment excellent. (“It’s really excellent.” )
      • Ça a l’air délicieux. (“It looks delicious.” )
      • Ça sent très bon. (“It smells very good.” )
      • Mes compliments au chef. (“My compliments to the chef.” )

      In France, we joke about the fact that burping is a way to show your appreciation for the food, but unless you’re among friends in a private environment, you should certainly refrain from letting it out.

        → Learn more about table manners in our Complete Guide on French Etiquette.

      And here are some mild compliments for when you’re satisfied, but not impressed:

      • C’est sympa. (“It’s nice.” )
      • C’est pas mal. (“It’s okay.” )
      • C’est pas pire. (“It’s okay.” Quebec only.)
      • C’est pas dégueu. (“It’s not bad.” [Familiar] Originally about food, but we use it figuratively for any other thing.)

      A Cheesecake Slice with Strawberry Topping

      Ça a l’air très bon ! (“It looks delicious!” )

      5. What Comes After a Compliment

      Complimenting is often a two-way street and there are some social norms for the aftermath.

      How should you say “thank you”? What do you answer after someone thanks you for your compliment? Should you deflect compliments? Everything will be answered in this chapter.

      1 – Express Your Gratitude

      The easiest thing you can do after a compliment is to accept it and thank the complimenter. Look the person in the eyes, smile, say “thank you,” and you’ll be fine! (Yes, I’m also teaching you how to look human, in case you’re an android or a disguised alien.)

      • Merci ! (“Thank you!” )
      • Merci beaucoup. (“Thank you very much.” )

      What if you compliment someone and receive a merci?

      • De rien ! (“You’re welcome!” Literally: “of nothing” )
      • Je t’en prie. (“You’re welcome.” Literally: “I pray you for it.” )

      2 – Answer with Another Compliment

      This is the equivalent of answering “What’s up?” with “How are you doing?” but it’s still perfectly acceptable.

      Complimenting someone back in French is the same as in English. You can either answer with a simple “you too” or try and be more creative.

      For example:

      • Tu as de très beaux yeux. (“You have very beautiful eyes.” )
        Toi aussi. [Casual] / Vous aussi. [Formal] (“You too!” )
      • J’adore ton t-shirt ! (“I love your T-shirt!” )
        Merci, mais je ne peux pas rivaliser avec ta chemise. (“Thank you, but I can’t compete with your shirt.” )

      3 – Don’t Deny Compliments or Demean Yourself

      Another way to react to a compliment is to deny it by explaining why you don’t deserve it. It usually sounds awkward and may be insulting to the complimenter, so obviously, I would not recommend it. But here’s how it would sound in French:

      • J’adore ton t-shirt ! (“I love your T-shirt!” )
        C’est juste un vieux truc que je porte pour dormir. (“It’s just an old rag I sleep with.” )
      • Très bon travail, ton script. (“Very good work on your script.” )
        Je trouve ça plutôt ennuyeux, mais merci. (“I find it rather boring, but thank you.” )

      In general, you should embrace the compliment and accept it with modesty. Don’t undermine the compliment with phrases such as:

      • Oh non, c’est rien. (“Oh no, it’s no big deal.” )
      • Non, ce n’était vraiment rien. (“No, but it was nothing.” )

      4 – Share the Credit

      If you ever answer with a compliment, do it genuinely, without entering a compliment battle.

      However, you can give credit where it’s due, and accept the compliment while sharing the credit with your team or contributors. For example:

      • Rien de tout ça n’aurait été possible sans mon équipe. (“None of this would have been possible without my team.” )

      Man and Woman Complimenting Each Other at a Piano

      – Tu as de beaux cheveux. (“You have beautiful hair.” )
      Toi aussi. (“You too.” )
      – …

      6. Compliments and the French Culture of Seduction

      1 – Complimenting VS Showing Interest

      It’s always nice to receive compliments, but what most of the French really want (besides eternal life and free cookies) is to generate interest and curiosity. If you’re hitting on a guy with a beautiful beard, don’t compliment him on his beard; he’s heard that one countless times.

      You should go for something original and unpredictable, or even better: Skip the compliment entirely and just show your interest in whatever he’s doing, what he likes, his values, his core beliefs, or his favorite Star Wars characters. Anything, as long as it’s meaningful to both of you.

      Especially in Paris, French girls get a lot of hassle from the sad crowd of wannabe Don Juans loitering in the streets and metro stations. As a result, compliments are just not as well-received as they used to be. Unspoken compliments, such as an eloquent stare, a smile, or a sincere show of interest can go a much longer way.

      2 – The “Negs Hit,” a French Pickup Technique

      Disclaimer: I’m not advocating pickup techniques in general, but I find this one culturally interesting.

      Popularized by self-proclaimed “Pick-Up Artist” Erik Von Markovik, the Negs Hit is a negative comment aimed at your target (usually a girl you want to seduce) to destabilize her and get her to lower her guard.

      It’s usually aimed toward girls with high self-esteem, if they get overly defensive at your approach. Using Negs Hits with someone who’s already into you and opening up would be counter-productive.

      A Negs Hit is not supposed to be insulting or hurtful, and should not target any major flaw the person is likely to have a complex about. It’s a slightly embarrassing and seemingly innocent comment you’d make on a flaw in her looks or behavior. By doing so, you communicate that you’re not impressed with her desirability and that you’re not interested in her as a potential partner.

      It’s supposed to create curiosity and interest toward you, as well as lower her guard for the moment you’d choose to switch to a more traditional seductive approach, should you decide to do so. I personally think it should just be called “having a sense of humor,” and it works wonders to filter people out who don’t have one, as they’ll get angry at your comment and walk away.

      A Man Flirting with a Woman from a Window

      Jolie coiffure ! C’est une perruque ? (“Nice hairstyle! Is it a wig?” )

      7. Le Mot De La Fin

      In this guide, you’ve learned everything about French compliments: how to compliment a guy or a girl, how to cheer the chef, and even how to flirt in French. You’ve also learned many praise words in French and how to put them together. Did I forget any important compliment you’d like to know about? Do you feel ready to express your appreciation and gratitude using everything we’ve learned today?

      FrenchPod101 also has tons of vocabulary lists with audio recordings and free resources to boost your studies and keep your French learning fresh and entertaining!

      Remember that you can also use our premium service, MyTeacher, to get personal one-on-one coaching and have your private teacher help you practice compliments and more, using assignments, personalized exercises, and recorded audio samples for you. Your teacher can also review your audio recordings to help improve your pronunciation.

      Happy learning on FrenchPod101.com!

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      About the Author: Born and bred in the rainy north of France, Cyril Danon has been bouncing off various jobs before he left everything behind to wander around the wonders of the World. Now, after quenching his wanderlust for the last few years, he’s eager to share his passion for languages.