Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hi everyone! This is Lower Beginner Season 2 Lesson 13, Feeling the Hunger in France! Brandon here!
Yasmine: Bonjour. I'm Yasmine.
Brandon: In this lesson, you'll learn how to express different degrees of hunger, thirst, and exhaustion. This conversation takes place at work.
Yasmine: This conversation is between Pierre and Anthony.
Brandon: The speakers are friends, so the speakers will be using informal French. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Pierre: Quel est le problem ?
Anthony: Je suis un peu fatigué.
Pierre: As-tu trop mangé à midi?
Anthony: Non je n’ai rien mangé du tout.
Pierre: Tu as soif alors?
Anthony: Non, je pense que je suis épuisé.
Pierre: Courage, c’est l’heure du dîner.
Brandon: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Pierre: Quel est le problem ?
Anthony: Je suis un peu fatigué.
Pierre: As-tu trop mangé à midi?
Anthony: Non je n’ai rien mangé du tout.
Pierre: Tu as soif alors?
Anthony: Non, je pense que je suis épuisé.
Pierre: Courage, c’est l’heure du dîner.
Brandon: Listen to the conversation with an English translation.
Pierre: Quel est le problème?
Pierre: What's wrong?
Anthony: Je suis un peu fatigué.
Anthony: I'm a little tired.
Pierre: As-tu trop mangé à midi?
Pierre: Did you eat too much for lunch?
Anthony: Non je n’ai rien mangé du tout.
Anthony: No, I didn't eat at all.
Pierre: Tu as soif alors?
Pierre: So you are thirsty?
Anthony: Non, je pense que je suis épuisé.
Anthony: No, I think I'm exhausted.
Pierre: Courage, c’est l’heure du dîner.
Pierre: Cheer up, it's dinner time.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: So what do French people usually eat? I know a typical French meal has three courses.
Yasmine: Right, an entrée, which is soup or salad, then a plat principal.
Brandon: That’s a main course with meat or fish.
Yasmine: Then we have fromage, cheese, and/or dessert. We often have a baguette too.
Brandon: For snacks, I think people eat bread with chocolate or butter, or chips and peanuts, is that right? What do you eat?
Yasmine: That’s right, but I'm a vegan and in France it’s not very easy.
Brandon: Yeah, I guess French people aren’t really used to vegetarian or vegan food.
Yasmine: Yeah. It’s really difficult to find a restaurant that doesn’t cook meat.
Brandon: How would you talk about your lunch?
Yasmine: Le midi je mange un repas végétalien avec une baguette de pain.
Brandon: Meaning "For lunch I eat a vegan meal with a baguette." Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let’s take a look at the vocabularies and phrases in this lesson. The first word is..
Yasmine: problème [natural native speed]
Brandon: problem
Yasmine: problème [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: problème [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: fatigué [natural native speed]
Brandon: tired
Yasmine: fatigué [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: fatigué [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: soif [natural native speed]
Brandon: thirst
Yasmine: soif [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: soif [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: alors [natural native speed]
Brandon: then, well
Yasmine: alors [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: alors [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: épuisé [natural native speed]
Brandon: exhausted
Yasmine: épuisé [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: épuisé [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: courage [natural native speed]
Brandon: bravery
Yasmine: courage [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: courage [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: heure [natural native speed]
Brandon: hour
Yasmine: heure [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: heure [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: dîner [natural native speed]
Brandon: to have dinner
Yasmine: dîner [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: dîner [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Yasmine: épuisé
Brandon: meaning "exhausted."
Yasmine: épuisé is a French adjective in the masculine form. Its feminine form is épuisée.
Brandon: Most French adjectives must be placed after the noun they modify, so let’s hear an example.
Yasmine: Je suis épuisé.
Brandon: Meaning “I am exhausted.” So when would we not use this expression?
Yasmine: Epuisé means “exhausted, out of energy.”
Brandon: What if we want to be a little less dramatic, like we’re not totally exhausted?
Yasmine: You can use fatigué. It just means "tired."
Brandon: Can you give us an example?
Yasmin: Sure! Ce matin il a l'air fatigué.
Brandon: "This morning he looks tired." For more examples, check the lesson notes!
Yasmine: épuisé is related to the adjective épuisant, meaning “exhausting.” Ce travail est épuisant!
Brandon: “This work is exhausting!” Okay, next we have..
Yasmine: Courage
Brandon: meaning "courage, bravery."
Yasmine: Courage is a masculine noun.
Brandon: It describes the moral strength to face hardships, danger and suffering. Would we use this phrase to describe someone too?
Yasmine: To describe a person and not behavior you can use the adjective courageux, which is related to courage.
Brandon: Can you give us an example?
Yasmin: Sure! Il est très courageux.
Brandon “He is very courageous.”
Yasmine: A commonly used French interjection is Bon courage!
Brandon: Sounds like it's an equivalent to "hang in there" in English, or maybe "do your best."
Yasmin: Right.
Brandon: It’s a phrase you can say to colleagues who have been presented with a difficult task to perform. Okay, next we have..
Yasmine: Avoir soif/faim,
Brandon: literally "to have thirst” or “ to have hunger." essentially it means to be thirsty or hungry.
Yasmine: Although the literal French equivalent of "to be" is être, there are some French expressions that use the verb avoir, to have, instead, such as avoir soif/faim. We say J'ai faim and J'ai soif.
Brandon: “I’m hungry” and “I’m thirsty.” What if we’re really really hungry?
Yasmine: You can use a common French expression- mourir de faim/soif.
Brandon: That literally means “I'm dying of hunger/thirst.” Sounds like “I’m starving” in English. It's a funny expression you can use in the normal language. With co-workers or friends it's not impolite at all. Can you give us an example?
Yasmine: Sure! Je n'ai pas soif du tout par contre je meurs de faim.
Brandon: "I am not thirsty at all, on the other hand, I'm starving."
Yasmine: Another famous expression is Avoir une faim de loup.
Brandon: The literal translation is “to have a wolf's hunger." It means you’re very hungry and sounds similar to the English expression "I could eat a horse.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you'll learn about using comparative quantitative vocabulary like “too much,” “a little/a bit,” and expressions for hunger and thirst in French.
Yasmine: In the dialogue, we had Tu as soif alors?,
Brandon: meaning “So you are thirsty?” How can we express our hunger and thirst?
Yasmine: Use the verb avoir. The literal translation of avoir is "to have." For example, J'ai un ami espagnol.
Brandon: "I have a Spanish friend."
Yasmine: We often use verbs like être, meaning to be.
Brandon: It’s very common so you must know how to use it correctly. Avoir translates in English to the verb "to be" when speaking of age, thirst or hunger. Can you give us an example?
Yasmine: J'ai 30 ans.
Brandon: "I am thirty years old." You can find more examples in the lesson notes! What if we want to talk about being a little hungry, or very thirsty?
Yasmine: You can use comparative words.
Brandon: Let’s hear a few. Pay attention!
Yasmine: peu
Brandon: "little, few"
Yasmine: quelques
Brandon: "some"
Yasmine: plusieurs
Brandon: "several"
Yasmine: beaucoup
Brandon: "a lot"
Yasmine: nombreux, un grand nombre
Brandon: "numerous, a lot, a big number of." Using these words, you can make the following expressions. “I’m a little bit hungry.”
Yasmine: J'ai un peu faim.
Brandon: “I’m really hungry.”
Yasmine: J'ai très faim.
Brandon: Here are other comparative quantitative words that you can use. Listen carefully! You should follow these words with a noun.
Yasmine: un peu de
Brandon: “a little of”
Yasmine: beaucoup de
Brandon: “a lot of “
Yasmine: Here’s an example, Je voudrais un peu de fromage.
Brandon: "I'd like some cheese." You can also use these words with a verb. In that case, the verb will come before the comparative word. Check the lesson notes for more key comparative vocabulary. What if there’s too much of something?
Yasmine: You can use trop de.
Brandon: It means “too much” and should go after a noun or before a verb. Can you give us an example in a sentence?
Yasmine: Sure. C'est trop de charcuterie.
Brandon: "It's too much cold meat." What if we’ve got just enough of something?
Yasmine: You can use assez or suffisament de.
Brandon: They both mean "sufficient” or “enough" and are used in the same way as the words above. Yasmine, can you give us an example?
Yasmine: Sure. C'est assez./ça suffit.
Brandon: "It's enough." You can find more examples in the lesson notes, so don’t forget to check.

Outro

Brandon: Okay, that’s it for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone. See you next time!
Yasmine: À bientôt!

10 Comments

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FrenchPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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What's your favorite French snack?

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:31 am
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Salut Jimmy,


Thank you for your question. You can access your flashcards on this link: https://www.frenchpod101.com/learningcenter/flashcards/flashcards. However, please note that if you want to learn the vocabulary of a lesson using flashcards, you need to select them first (there is a select all selection box on top of each Vocabulary section to make the process faster) and then click on the Add to Flashcard Deck. Then, using the above link, you will be able to see your saved flashcard deck and study from them.


We hope it helps. If you have any other questions, please let us know. Good luck with your French! :)


Kind regards,

Levente

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Jimmy Reandeau
Sunday at 8:26 am
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How do I access the flashcards?

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 9:33 pm
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Hi Pat,


Thank you for leaving the comment.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane 

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Pat Bercowetz’s
Wednesday at 6:54 pm
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A baguette would probably be made with butter, so it would not be vegan!!

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 8:39 pm
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Hi Patricia,


Thank you for your positive feedback!


Let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

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Gloria
Friday at 2:52 pm
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J'aime les croissants au beurre.

Patricia Macmaster
Thursday at 10:09 pm
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👍Clearly done and useful.

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Friday at 6:05 am
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Bonjour John !


Merci pour votre commentaire et votre question !

En français on dit "casse croûte" "en cas" et on dit aussi "snack" ! :smile:


A bientôt et bonne journée !

Marie Alice

Team FrenchPod101.com

John
Friday at 5:20 am
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Bonsoir! J'ai une petite question!

Comment dit-on "a snack" en français?