Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Let’s take a closer look at each of these expressions.
First, do you remember how Karen says,
"See you soon."
Karen Lee: À bientôt.
This starts with the preposition, à, which means something like “until," in this context. À (enunciated). À.
Next is bientôt, "soon." Bientôt (enunciated). Bientôt.
All together, À bientôt. means something like, “Until soon,” but translates as, "See you soon."
Karen Lee: À bientôt.
À bientôt. is fairly informal, which indicates a close relationship between Karen and Mathilde Martin, her former homestay mother.
Do you remember how Sasha says,
"Good night."
Sasha Lee: Bonne nuit.
"Goodnight." Bonne nuit.
Bonne nuit literally means "goodnight." Bonne nuit (enunciated).
Sasha Lee: Bonne nuit.
You use Bonne nuit, "goodnight," when someone is about to go to bed, and often when you don’t plan on seeing someone again that night.
Do you remember how Ben says,
"Rest well."
Ben Lee: Repose-toi bien.
"Rest well." Repose-toi bien.
First is repose-toi, meaning “rest.” Repose-toi (enunciated). Repose-toi.
Note, repose-toi is from the verb se reposer, meaning ”to rest.” Se reposer.
Next is bien, "well." Bien (enunciated). Bien.
Together, Repose-toi bien. "Rest well."
Ben Lee: Repose-toi bien.
Note, this is appropriate for informal situations.
Do you remember how Mathilde says,
"See you later."
Mathilde Martin: À plus tard.
"See you later." À plus tard.
This starts with the preposition, à, which means something like, “until,” in this case. À (enunciated). À.
After this is plus, "more." Plus (enunciated). Plus.
Pronunciation note, in most cases, you pronounce the s-sound in plus; however, in this specific expression, you don’t have to.
Tard means "late." Tard (enunciated). Tard.
All together, it's À plus tard. This means something like "Until later" but translates as "See you later."
Mathilde Martin: À plus tard.
Mathilde uses this to say goodbye to everyone. Even though it is slightly formal, it’s a friendly way to say goodbye.
With friends, French people tend to shorten a plus tard to a plus. In this case, you must pronounce the "s."
À plus. "See you." À plus (enunciated). À plus.

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Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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How would you say goodbye to someone late at night?