Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Let’s take a closer look at each of these expressions.
In the first conversation, do you remember how Mark says,
"Good morning, Ms. Simon."
Mark Lee: Bonjour, Madame Simon.
First is Bonjour, which literally means "Good day," but translates as "Good morning" in this context. Bonjour (enunciated). Bonjour.
Note, Bonjour is a flexible greeting that can be used to mean “good morning,” “good afternoon” or even just “hello.” You can use it all day until the evening.
Next is Madame. "Ms." Madame (enunciated). Madame. This is an honorific used for women.
Finally, the teacher’s family name, Simon. Simon. Simon (enunciated). Simon.
Together, it's Madame Simon. "Ms. Simon." Madame Simon.
All together, it's Bonjour, Madame Simon. "Good morning, Ms. Simon."
Mark Lee: Bonjour, Madame Simon.
When including a person’s name in a greeting, it’s more common to say the person’s name after the greeting.
Note, using a person’s family name in a greeting may come across as more formal.
Do you remember the teacher's response,
"Good morning, Mr. Lee."
Sadia Simon: Bonjour, Monsieur Lee.
First is Bonjour. "Good morning," in this context. Bonjour.
Next, monsieur, "Mr." Monsieur (enunciated). Monsieur. This is an honorific used for men.
Finally, Mark’s family name, Lee, pronounced in French. Lee. Lee (enunciated). Lee.
All together, it’s Bonjour, Monsieur Lee. "Good morning, Mr. Lee."
Sadia Simon: Bonjour, Monsieur Lee.
Note, this exchange is formal.
In the second conversation, which takes place at noon, do you remember how Karen says,
"Hello."
Hint: It’s the same greeting as the one used in the morning.
Karen Lee: Bonjour.
Note that Karen’s greeting is slightly less formal, as she doesn’t say the teacher’s name.
Bonjour. "Hello." Bonjour.
The teacher's response is the same,
Sadia Simon: Bonjour.
This can translate as “Hello,” or “Good afternoon.”
Bonjour is a common way to greet people during the day. You can use it in formal and less formal situations.
In the third conversation, which takes place in the evening at 6pm, do you remember how Ben says,
"Good evening."
Ben Lee: Bonsoir, professeure.
Bonsoir, professeure. "Good evening, teacher." Bonsoir, professeure.
Bonsoir is a common way to greet people during the evening and at night, in formal and less formal situations. Bonsoir (enunciated). Bonsoir.
Next is, professeure. This is the title meaning "teacher," in this case. Professeure (enunciated). Professeure.
In French, all nouns have grammatical gender and are either singular or plural. Professeure is feminine and singular.
All together, it’s Bonsoir, professeure. "Good evening, teacher."
Ben Lee: Bonsoir, professeure.
Do you remember the teacher's response,
"Good evening, Ben."
Sadia Simon: Bonsoir, Ben.
First is Bonsoir. "Good evening." Bonsoir.
Next is Ben’s name pronounced in French. Ben. Ben (enunciated). Ben.
Together, it's Bonsoir, Ben. "Good evening, Ben."
Sadia Simon: Bonsoir, Ben.
Note that the teacher addresses Ben by his first name, as he is younger. This makes the greeting sound more informal.

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How would you greet someone early in the morning?