Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Céline: Bonjour je suis Céline!
Sam: Hello, Sam here. Newbie Series, Season 2, Lesson 6 - “How to have to love.” Céline, what’s the focus of today’s lesson?
Céline: Well, the focus of this lesson is the possessive adjectives.
Sam: Okay, sounds good. And where does the conversation take place?
Céline: It takes place in a honeymoon and is between Julie and Marc.
Sam: Okay, they’re newlyweds. Shall we start?
Céline: Oui!
DIALOGUE
Male 1: Ma chérie...
Céline: Mon amour?
Male 1: Nous sommes ensemble!
Céline: Mes deux amours, toi et le chocolat!
Sam: Now, let’s try that again, slowly.
Male 1: Ma chérie...
Céline: Mon amour?
Male 1: Nous sommes ensemble!
Céline: Mes deux amours, toi et le chocolat!
Sam: Now, let’s try that with the English.
Male 1: Ma chérie...
Male 2: “My darling.”
Céline: Mon amour?
Male 2: “My love.”
Male 1: Nous sommes ensemble!
Male 2: “We are together.”
Céline: Mes deux amours, toi et le chocolat!
Male 2: “My two loves, you and chocolate.”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Céline: So, Sam, do you know the French expression “être chocolat”?
Sam: Yeah, it means “to be chocolate”.
Céline: No, it means “somebody takes you for a ride”.
Sam: I understand.
Céline: So, you’ve been fooled.
Sam: Being fooled?
Céline: Oui.
Sam: Can I ask a question?
Céline: Bien sûr. Of course.
Sam: Do French people love chocolate?
Céline: Oh oui! We always eat chocolate. Black, milk, praline.
Sam: Pralines.
Céline: Yes. We offer as a gift to friends or relatives. If you’re invited to a nice dinner, you should buy a chocolate box. But try to get good ones.
Sam: Should I buy chocolate or is the box made of chocolate?
Céline: No, chocolates.
Sam: Okay. Where can we get good chocolate?
Céline: Well, Switzerland for milk and black, Belgium for black and pralines.
Sam: Pralines.
Céline: And France for black. You know, Sam, we have in southern France some fantastic chocolate “artisans”, and I really recommend it to buy from them, they’re so delicious.
Sam: “Artisans”? What’s that?
Céline: It’s, you know, small shops and handmade chocolate, not factory made.
Sam: Like a small, cozy shop.
Céline: Yes.
Sam: Wow, delicious, I bet. Well, my dear Céline, that sounds fantastic. I’m sorry but we have to taste some vocab and phrases now.
Céline: Okay.
VOCAB LIST
Sam: Now, let’s take a look at some of the vocabulary from this lesson. The first item is?
Céline: Ma.
Sam: “My” - feminine.
Céline: Ma. Ma.
Sam: Next.
Céline: Mon.
Sam: “My” - masculine.
Céline: Mon. Mon.
Sam: Next.
Céline: Mes.
Sam: “My” - plural.
Céline: Mes. Mes.
Sam: Next.
Céline: Chéri(e).
Sam: “Honey” or “darling”.
Céline: Chéri(e). Chéri(e).
Sam: Next.
Céline: Amour.
Sam: “Love”.
Céline: Amour. Amour.
Sam: Next.
Céline: Chocolat.
Sam: “Chocolate”.
Céline: Chocolat. Chocolat.
Sam: Next.
Céline: Ensemble.
Sam: “Together”.
Céline: Ensemble. Ensemble.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Sam: Now, let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the items from this lesson.
Céline: So the first phrase is “ma chérie”, “ma chérie” and it’s the first line of our dialogue. It means?
Sam: “My darling.”
Céline: Yes. “chéri(e)” can be used as a noun as illustrated here or an adjective as “ma femme chérie”, “my darling wife”, “chéri” is widely used among couples to get your partner’s attention. Another way to call your future spouse is to use “amour” as in “mon amour”. Can you try, Sam?
Sam: Mon amour.
Céline: Bien! So this phrase means “my love”. That’s very sweet, right?
Sam: Yes, it is. That is very sweet. How about for a girl you’re just dating?
Céline: Ma puce.
Sam: Literally “my [flea]”.
Céline: Mon coeur.
Sam: “My heart”.
Céline: Ma biche.
Sam: “My doe”.
Céline: Ma crevette.
Sam: “My shrimp”.
Céline: Or “bébé”.
Sam: “Baby”.
Céline: Exactement, to women only.
Sam: Oh, I understand. So, Céline, can you give us the French for those just one more time?
Céline: Ma puce.
Sam: Literally, “my [flea]”.
Céline: Mon coeur.
Sam: “My heart”.
Céline: Ma biche.
Sam: “My doe”.
Céline: Ma crevette.
Sam: “My shrimp”.
Céline: Bébé.
Sam: “Baby”, to women.
Céline: Exactement. Exactly. To men its kind the same but you can use “mon lapin”.
Sam: “My hot rabbit”.
Céline: Non “my hot rabbit” is “mon chaud lapin”.
Sam: So “mon lapin” must mean “my rabbit”.
Céline: Exactement. Exactly.
Sam: Great.
Céline: Well, Sam, next phrase is “nous sommes ensemble”.
Sam: “We are together”?
Céline: Yes.
Sam: Can you break it down for us?
Céline: Nous sommes ensemble.
Sam: “We are together.”
Céline: So, in this phrase the irregular verb used is “être” at the present tense. The form “sommes” is the conjugation of “être” at the first person, plural.
Sam: Can you give us some more examples?
Céline: How about “Nous sommes ensemble pour le pire et le meilleur”?
Sam: “We are together for the better or the worse.” I like the better.
Céline: Bien sûr. Me too, moi aussi. So, in the last phrase, Julie says: Mes 2 amours, toi et le chocolat.
Sam: So it’s just fine, right? Her second love is the chocolate.
Céline: Yes… Haha, n’importe quoi.

Lesson focus

Sam: So, shall we take a bite out of some grammar?
Céline: Oui Sam. Yes.
Sam: Interesting French cultural insight.
Céline: Yes, mon chou.
Sam: “My cabbage”.
Céline: Yes, “my cabbage”. It’s a pet name in French, too.
Sam: Oh, wow, you use the possessive. That makes me think of “ma chérie” and “mon amour”. The focus of this grammar is possessive adjectives, right?
Céline: Oui Sam. So, “MA chérie” and “MON amour”. “Ma” is for feminine nouns and “mon” for masculine nouns and feminine nouns starting with a vowel.
Sam: “Ma chérie” means “my darling”.
Céline: Exactly and “mon” is used with a masculine noun as in “mon amour”.
Sam: “My love”. Oh, interesting. Can you give us an example with “mon” and a feminine noun?
Céline: Mon orange.
Sam: “My orange”, that sounds lovely.
Céline: So, orange is a feminine noun but it starts with a vowel. So, it’s “mon orange”.
Sam: Of course, Céline, “mon orange”. “Orange” is feminine but you could never say “ma orange” because that would be two vowels together.
Céline: Exactly. Never, never-ever.
Sam: Okay, we’ve covered “my” so next must be “your”.
Céline: Oui. “Ta” is used with feminine nouns and “ton” with masculine nouns or feminine nouns starting with a vowel.
Sam: Oh, same rule.
Céline: Oui.
Sam: But instead of “my” we’re saying “your”.
Céline: Exactement.
Sam: Okay, great. So, we’ve covered “my” and “your”. How about “his” or “her”? Same rule?
Céline: But when in English is different, it’s her and his, in French, “her” is “sa”.
Sam: What about “his”?
Céline: “Son”
Sam: So, it’s the same rule!
Céline: Oui, ok. Yes, it’s the same rule.
Sam: So, let’s recap. Mon, ma, mes, ton, ta, tes, son, sa, ses.
Céline: Parfait. The pronunciation is very good, Sam.
Sam: Oh, thank you. Let’s remind our listeners, too, that when we’re using possessives, don’t think about if the owner’s male or female. Think about the object at hand. So, what if we wanted to say “my chair”?
Céline: Ma chaise.
Sam: “My chair”. And is “chair” masculine or feminine?
Céline: You tell me.
Sam: “Ma chaise”, sounds like it’s feminine.
Céline: Tout à fait. Yes.
Sam: Okay, that’s easy. What if I wanted to say “your chair”?
Céline: Ta chaise.
Sam: It’s still feminine. What about “his chair”?
Céline: Sa chaise.
Sam: What about “her chair”?
Céline: Sa chaise.
Sam: So, the possessive deals with the object at hand, not whether the owner’s male or female. Be very careful with that. Just remember, is the item masculine or feminine, and then just choose the possessive. It’s that easy.
Céline: Exactly. Don’t forget, Sam, about the plural forms. Don’t bother if it’s feminine or masculine. Use “mes”.
Sam: “My”.
Céline: Tes.
Sam: “Yours”.
Céline: Ses.
Sam: “Theirs”, okay. Céline, what if I wanted to say “my chair”?
Céline: Ma chaise.
Sam: What if I wanted to say “my chairs”?
Céline: Mes chaises.
Sam: What if I wanted to say “your chair”?
Céline: Ta chaise.
Sam: “Your chairs”.
Céline: Tes chaises.
Sam: How would we say “his chair”?
Céline: Sa chaise.
Sam: How about “her chair”?
Céline: Sa chaise.

Outro

Sam: Well, that’s a nice place to end. For more examples, check the PDF at FrenchPod101.com and that just about does it for today, until the next time!
Céline: Merci Sam.
Sam: Merci Céline, au revoir.
Céline: A bientôt!

Grammar

French Grammar Made Easy - Unlock This Lesson’s Grammar Guide

Easily master this lesson’s grammar points with in-depth explanations and examples. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

25 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Frenchpod101.com
Saturday at 11:38 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Bonjour Jimmy


Thank you for your comment.

Could you tell me exactly where is the problem you are talking about?

Which section?



Bonne journée !

Marie Alice

Team FrenchPod101.com

Jimmy Reandeau
Sunday at 3:55 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

In the phrase you have manteau instead of chapeau (hat)

FrenchPod101.com
Friday at 7:27 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Re-bonjour Carlos !


Comment allez-vous ?

C'est dommage que les féminins-masculins Français ne soient pas les même en Espagnol.

Ce serait plus simple pour apprendre ! 😄


Bonne journée et à bientôt !

Marie Alice

Team FrenchPod101.com

Carlos
Tuesday at 4:47 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

In Spanish, pronouns have genders too: masculine and feminine. The genders in French don't match the genders in Spanish, though. But the possessive pronouns in French seem perfectly reasonable and easy to me.


Salut!

Frenchpod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 4:42 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Bonjour Shaun !


Effectivement c'est compliqué ! ??

C'est très difficile de prédire si un nom est masculin ou féminin juste avec son orthographe. Malheureusement il faut souvent apprendre par cœur, sans chercher de logique !


A bientôt !

Marie Alice

Team FrenchPod101.com

Shaun
Friday at 6:52 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Merci beaucoup, Marie Alice!


I can't explain in French yet, but I thought "hyène" would take "son" due to the silent 'h'! I am guessing 'y' does not count as a vowel for this, then! Très rusée, la grammaire française...


Bonne journée!

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 10:00 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

C'est très mignon Shaun !


Merci d'avoir partagé cela avec nous ! ?

Par contre on dit "une hyène, sa hyène, ma hyène", car c'est un nom féminin.


Bonne journée et à bientôt !

Marie Alice

Team FrenchPod101.com

Shaun
Thursday at 6:39 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Il n'est pas ordinaire, mais en français j'appelle ma petite-amie "ma moufette" et elle m'appelle son hyène. Les mots secrets de notre amour. ?❤️️

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Friday at 11:36 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Kotryna,


Yes, it's ok to use "mon" in this case, but because it's for a female friend, you have to add one "e" => mon amie.


Don't hesitate to ask other questions!


Mailys

Team FrenchPod101.com

Kotryna
Monday at 1:48 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

so it's ok to say 'mon ami' for a female friend?

just because it starts with vowel