Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hi everyone! Welcome to FrenchPod101.com This is Lower Beginner Season 2, Lesson 4: Don't Forget To Do Your French Homework! I’m Brandon.
Yasmine: Bonjour. I'm Yasmine.
Brandon: Yasmine, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Yasmine: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use French numbers.
Brandon: This conversation takes place in a classroom.
Yasmine: It’s between a teacher, Thibaut, and a student, Stephane.
Brandon: Since this conversation is between a teacher and a student, they’ll be using formal French. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Thibaut: Etudiants, ouvrez votre livre au chapitre 4.
Stephane: Quelle page ?
Thibaut: La page 102 est votre exercice. Du numéro 1 à 10.
Stephane: Est-ce que c'est pour jeudi ?
Thibaut: Oui et il y aura un contrôle vendredi.
Brandon: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Thibaut: Etudiants, ouvrez votre livre au chapitre 4.
Stephane: Quelle page ?
Thibaut: La page 102 est votre exercice. Du numéro 1 à 10.
Stephane: Est-ce que c'est pour jeudi ?
Thibaut: Oui et il y aura un contrôle vendredi.
Brandon: Now, let’s hear it with the English translation.
Thibaut: Etudiants, ouvrez votre livre au chapitre 4.
Thibaut: Students, open your books to Chapter Four.
Stephane: Quelle page ?
Stephane: Which page?
Thibaut: La page 102 est votre exercice. Du numéro 1 à 10.
Thibaut: Page 102 is your homework. Numbers one through ten.
Stephane: Est-ce que c'est pour jeudi ?
Stephane: Is this due on Thursday?
Thibaut: Oui et il y aura un contrôle vendredi.
Thibaut: Yes, and there will be a test on Friday.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: What was it like to be a student in France? Could you pick your own classes?
Yasmine: French students can not decide their class assignments. That’s the role of the school administration. However, students may choose their seats during an individual lesson. Students have to move from one classroom to another during the day, according to their discipline.
Brandon: That’s a lot of moving around!
Yasmine: It is. During high school and college, I always had to go from classroom to classroom for different classes. Sometimes it was really annoying when I had to go to the opposite side of the campus and carry a heavy bag full of books.
Brandon: That must have been awful. Okay, let’s move on to the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let’s review the vocabulary words from this lesson. The first word is...
Yasmine: ...étudiant. [natural native speed]
Brandon: “Student.”
Yasmine: Étudiant. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Étudiant. [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next ...
Yasmine: ...livre. [natural native speed]
Brandon: “Book.”
Yasmine: Livre. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Livre. [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Yasmine: ...chapitre. [natural native speed]
Brandon: “Chapter.”
Yasmine: Chapitre. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Chapitre. [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Yasmine: ...exercice. [natural native speed]
Brandon: “Homework; exercise.”
Yasmine: Exercice. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Exercice. [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Yasmine: ...numéro. [natural native speed]
Brandon: “Number.”
Yasmine: Numéro. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Numéro. [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Yasmine: ...jeudi. [natural native speed]
Brandon: “Thursday.”
Yasmine: Jeudi. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Jeudi. [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Yasmine: ...contrôle. [natural native speed]
Brandon: “Test.”
Yasmine: Contrôle. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Contrôle. [natural native speed]
Brandon: and last...
Yasmine: ...vendredi. [natural native speed]
Brandon: “Friday.”
Yasmine: Vendredi. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Vendredi. [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Yasmine: ...ouvrir un livre.
Brandon: Meaning, "Open a book!"
Yasmine: Ouvrir is a verb meaning "to open," and livre is a noun meaning "book" in singular form. If you want to say "Open the books," then you can say, ouvrez les livres.
Brandon: Can we use this verb in other ways?
Yasmine: Yes, you can. You can use ouvrir with anything that you have to open. For example, you can say, si tu veux de l'eau tu dois ouvrir le robinet.
Brandon: Meaning, “If you want some water, you have to open the valve.”
Yasmine: Ouvrir also means “to start” or “to initiate.” For example, je veux ouvrir le débat, meaning “I want to start the debate.”
Brandon: When can we not use this expression?
Yasmine: Well, you can't use ouvrir without specifying what you are opening before or during the sentence. For example, j'ouvre les yeux.
Brandon: Meaning, “I'm opening my eyes.” Can you give us another example?
Yasmine: Quelqu'un frappe à la porte, je l'ouvre !
Brandon: Meaning, “Someone is knocking at the door; I'm opening it!”
Brandon: Now, can you give us another example using the whole key phrase?
Yasmine: Sure! Avant d'ouvrir un livre, je lis d'abord son résumé.
Brandon: "Before opening a book, I read the summary first."
Yasmine: And here’s a useful expression to know. The phrase lire en quelqu'un comme dans un livre ouvert means "read somebody like an open book."
Brandon: Okay, next we have...
Yasmine: Il y aura.
Brandon: Meaning "there will be."
Yasmine: This phrase is the future form of the French expression il y a meaning "there is." It’s one of the most important expressions in French, and it’s most commonly followed by an indefinite article, plus a noun; or a number, plus a noun; or an indefinite pronoun.
Brandon: Can you give us an example with this phrase?
Yasmine: Sure! Ce soir j'ai un repas avec ma famille. Il y aura mes tantes et mes grand-parents. Pas mon cousin. Je l'ai vu il y a trois jours.
Brandon: "Tonight I have a meal with my family. My aunts and grandparents will be there. Not my cousin. I saw him three days ago."
Yasmine: Now, to use il y aura in a negative statement, place n' in front of y and pas after aura. For example, il n'y aura pas mon cousin.
Brandon: Literally, “There will be not my cousin.”, but it means “My cousin will not be there”. Check out the lesson notes for more details on these key words and phrases. Okay, now on to the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you'll learn how to pronounce numbers, including pages, chapters, and volumes.
Yasmine: In the dialogue, we heard Thibaut, the teacher, say: etudiants, ouvrez votre livre au chapitre 4.
Brandon: Meaning, “Students, open your books to Chapter Four.” This is a pretty common instruction in a classroom. It will be helpful to familiarize yourself with numbers so that you can follow along in a class.
Yasmine: That’s right. We use numbers all the time in our daily lives. They help us function and manage our daily activities. In France, we use the ten-digit system.
Brandon: Yasmine, let’s run through the numbers from zero to ten, and then we’ll go from there. Listeners, Yasmine will give you the French number, and I’ll say the English translation. You can follow along with the chart in the lesson notes.
Yasmine: Okay. Zéro.
Brandon: “Zero.”
Yasmine: Un.
Brandon: “One.”
Yasmine: Deux.
Brandon: “Two.”
Yasmine: Trois.
Brandon: “Three.”
Yasmine: Quatre.
Brandon: “Four.”
Yasmine: Cinq.
Brandon: “Five.”
Yasmine: Six.
Brandon: “Six.”
Yasmine: Sept.
Brandon: “Seven.”
Yasmine: Huit.
Brandon: “Eight.”
Yasmine: Neuf.
Brandon: “Nine.”
Yasmine: Dix.
Brandon: “Ten.” Great! Let’s hear these all one more time.
Yasmine: Zéro, un, deux, trois, quatre, cinq, six, sept, huit, neuf, dix.
Brandon: Now that you know the numbers from zero to ten in French, it’s time to count from ten to nineteen.
Yasmine: These numbers use some of the words for one to ten, but some don’t. There’s no pattern.
Brandon: So, be sure to check out the lesson notes for details. Now let’s hear the numbers. We’ll start with ten.
Yasmine: Dix.
Brandon: “Ten.”
Yasmine: Onze.
Brandon: “Eleven.”
Yasmine: Douze.
Brandon: “Twelve.”
Yasmine: Treize.
Brandon: “Thirteen.”
Yasmine: Quatorze.
Brandon: “Fourteen.”
Yasmine: Quinze.
Brandon: “Fifteen.”
Yasmine: Seize.
Brandon: “Sixteen.”
Yasmine: Dix-sept.
Brandon: “Seventeen.”
Yasmine: Dix-huit.
Brandon: “Eighteen.”
Yasmine: Dix-neuf.
Brandon: “Nineteen.” Now, let’s hear them all one more time.
Yasmine: Dix, onze, douze, treize, quatorze, quinze, seize, dix-sept, dix-huit, dix-neuf.
Brandon: There really is no pattern to these numbers.
Yasmine: That’s right, and that’s why it may seem overwhelming at first. But we can learn these easily if we break down the series into two categories.
Brandon: So how do we do that.
Yasmine: The first category is from eleven to sixteen. These numbers have no common base word.
Brandon: So, what's the secret to mastering them?
Yasmine: Well, just learn them!
Brandon: What’s the next category?
Yasmine: It’s the numbers ten, and from seventeen to nineteen. These numbers have something in common, which will help you memorize them. They all contain the word dix, meaning "ten." So, as long as you know how to say seven, eight and nine, then you can learn how to say seventeen, eighteen, and nineteen.
Brandon: OK, Can you give us an example?
Yasmine: Sure! Take the word for “ten,” dix, and add the French word for the second digit. So if you want to say “eighteen,” then you’ll have dix plus huit. These two words are separated by a hyphen. dix-huit
Brandon: Great! Now let’s move on to chapters and volumes. Remember in the dialogue, Thibault said, “Open your books to Chapter Four.”
Yasmine: Right. Etudiants, ouvrez votre livre au chapitre 4. When you’re talking about a chapter, a volume, or a page, make sure you put the number after the word. For example, you can say la page, for “the page;” le chapitre for “the chapter,” and le volume for “the volume.”
Brandon: Can you give us an example?
Yasmine: Okay. La page cent-deux.
Brandon: “Page one hundred two.”
Yasmine: Le chapitre trois et le volume six.
Brandon: “Chapter three and volume six.” Seems easy enough! Listeners, Be sure to check out the lesson notes for more details.
MARKETING PIECE
Yasmine: Listeners, have you ever dreamed of starring in one of our lessons?
Brandon: If your answer is yes, then use the voice-recording-tool on the lessons page!
Yasmine: Record your voice with a click of a button...
Brandon: ...and then play it back just as easily.
Yasmine: Then, compare it to the native speakers in the lesson...
Brandon: ...and adjust your pronunciation!
Yasmine: After a few tries, you’ll be speaking better French than Brandon here!
Brandon: Hey!
Yasmine: Go to FrenchPod101.com, and rapidly improve your French pronunciation!

Outro

Brandon: Thank you for listening, everyone. we’ll See you next time!
Yasmine: À bientôt!

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FrenchPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Why are you studying French?

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:33 am
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Bonjour Deanna !


Il faut dire "ma famille est franco canadienne".


Merci pour votre commentaire ! :smile:

Bonne semaine !

Marie Alice

Team FrenchPod101.com

Deanna
Saturday at 10:44 am
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J'étudie le francaise parce que ma famille est francaise-canadienne ou canadienne-francaise. (Comment dit-on?) Aussi, j'habite à New York, mais près de Quebec, et j'aime la langue!