Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Greg: Hello everyone, this is Greg: and welcome back to FrenchPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner Season 1 Lesson 20 - Being Taken by Surprise in France.
Mailys: Bonjour tout le monde. This is Mailys. In this lesson, we will learn about the pronoun ‘en’ and how to form adverbs.
Greg: Jacques meets his friend Marcel after work and introduces him to Mireille for the first time.
Mailys: They are all using informal French.
Greg: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Jacques Marcel, par ici!
Marcel Salut mon vieux! Comment vas-tu? Je ne te vois pas beaucoup dernièrement!
Jacques Je sais, je sais, mais je suis occupé, tu sais, avec Mireille.
Marcel Ah ben, dis donc, ça a l’air de bien aller entre vous deux.
Jacques Ça, tu peux le dire! Ah, la voilà!... Mireille, je te présente mon bon ami Marcel. Marcel, je te présente Mireille, ma petite amie.
Mireille Salut Marcel! Jacques me parle toujours de toi!
Marcel Salut Mireille! Enchanté de faire ta connaissance! Jacques me parle beaucoup de toi aussi! Je t’offre un café?
Mireille C’est pas de refus.
Marcel Je t’en offre un aussi, Jacques?
Jacques Ah merci, je ne dis pas non.
Marcel Alors, ils ont des plans pour ce soir, les amoureux?
Jacques Non, nous n’en avons pas.
Mireille Ah si, nous en avons, nous allons dîner chez mes parents un peu plus tard.
Jacques QUOI!?!
Greg: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Jacques Marcel, par ici!
Marcel Salut mon vieux! Comment vas-tu? Je ne te vois pas beaucoup dernièrement!
Jacques Je sais, je sais, mais je suis occupé, tu sais, avec Mireille.
Marcel Ah ben, dis donc, ça a l’air de bien aller entre vous deux.
Jacques Ça, tu peux le dire! Ah, la voilà!... Mireille, je te présente mon bon ami Marcel. Marcel, je te présente Mireille, ma petite amie.
Mireille Salut Marcel! Jacques me parle toujours de toi!
Marcel Salut Mireille! Enchanté de faire ta connaissance! Jacques me parle beaucoup de toi aussi! Je t’offre un café?
Mireille C’est pas de refus.
Marcel Je t’en offre un aussi, Jacques?
Jacques Ah merci, je ne dis pas non.
Marcel Alors, ils ont des plans pour ce soir, les amoureux?
Jacques Non, nous n’en avons pas.
Mireille Ah si, nous en avons, nous allons dîner chez mes parents un peu plus tard.
Jacques QUOI!?!
Greg: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Jacques Marcel, par ici!
Greg: Marcel, over here!
Marcel Salut mon vieux! Comment vas-tu? Je ne te vois pas beaucoup dernièrement!
Greg: Hey, man! How are you? I don’t get to see much of you lately!
Jacques Je sais, je sais, mais je suis occupé, tu sais, avec Mireille.
Greg: I know, I know, but I’m busy, you know, with Mireille.
Marcel Ah ben, dis donc, ça a l’air de bien aller entre vous deux.
Greg: Gosh, things seem to be going pretty well between the two of you.
Jacques Ça, tu peux le dire! Ah, la voilà!... Mireille, je te présente mon bon ami Marcel. Marcel, je te présente Mireille, ma petite amie.
Greg: You can say that again! Oh, there she is!... Mireille, let me introduce my good friend Marcel. Marcel, here is Mireille, my girlfriend.
Mireille Salut Marcel! Jacques me parle toujours de toi!
Greg: Hi Marcel! Jacques always talks about you!
Marcel Salut Mireille! Enchanté de faire ta connaissance! Jacques me parle beaucoup de toi aussi! Je t’offre un café?
Greg: Hi Mireille! Nice to meet you! Jacques also talks a lot about you! Shall I offer you coffee?
Mireille C’est pas de refus.
Greg: Gladly.
Marcel Je t’en offre un aussi, Jacques?
Greg: Can I also offer you one, Jacques?
Jacques Ah merci, je ne dis pas non.
Greg: Ah thanks, I won’t say no.
Marcel Alors, ils ont des plans pour ce soir, les amoureux?
Greg: So, do the love birds have any plans for this evening?
Jacques Non, nous n’en avons pas.
Greg: No, we don’t have any.
Mireille Ah si, nous en avons, nous allons dîner chez mes parents un peu plus tard.
Greg: Sure we do, we are having supper with my parents a bit later.
Jacques QUOI!?!
Greg: WHAT!?!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Greg: Looks like Jacques was in for a shock!
Mailys: He sure was! It sounds like he’ll be meeting Mireille’s parents for dinner.
Greg: Yes, so let’s talk about that a bit - food is an important part of life in France and throughout French-speaking cultures.
Mailys: People really enjoy inviting friends over to socialize and are even proud to cook for them whatever their special recipe is.
Greg: These meals are mostly informal, but the host usually takes great pride in providing an experience their guests will enjoy.
Mailys: To thank the host, the guests usually bring a little gift. This can be a bottle of wine, a dessert item, a gift for the house or even a special cheese that the others can try.
Greg: The meal is often served in many courses so that the guests have a lot of time to talk and socialize.
Mailys: If you have French friends, why not invite them over for supper?
Greg: Yes, I think that’s a great idea! Now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Greg: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Mailys: par ici [natural native speed]
Greg: this way, over here
Mailys: par ici [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mailys: par ici [natural native speed]
Next:
Mailys: vieux [natural native speed]
Greg: old
Mailys: vieux [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mailys: vieux [natural native speed]
Next:
Mailys: dernièrement [natural native speed]
Greg: lately
Mailys: dernièrement [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mailys: dernièrement [natural native speed]
Next:
Mailys: dis donc [natural native speed]
Greg: say! gosh!
Mailys: dis donc [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mailys: dis donc [natural native speed]
Next:
Mailys: ami [natural native speed]
Greg: friend
Mailys: ami [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mailys: ami [natural native speed]
Next:
Mailys: toujours [natural native speed]
Greg: always
Mailys: toujours [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mailys: toujours [natural native speed]
Next:
Mailys: connaissance [natural native speed]
Greg: acquaintance, knowledge
Mailys: connaissance [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mailys: connaissance [natural native speed]
Next:
Mailys: c’est pas de refus [natural native speed]
Greg: I won't say no, I won't refuse
Mailys: c’est pas de refus [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mailys: c’est pas de refus [natural native speed]
Next:
Mailys: dîner [natural native speed]
Greg: to have dinner
Mailys: dîner [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Mailys: dîner [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Greg: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Greg: ‘Vieux’ means “old”, but only in relation to age or time, and not in the sense of former.
Mailys: The feminine is ‘vieille’.
Mailys: Here are some examples. Tes parents ne sont pas très vieux.
Greg: Your parents aren't very old.
Mailys: Il cherche son vieux livre.
Greg: He's looking for his old book.
Mailys: Nous habitons dans cette vieille rue depuis dix ans.
Greg: We've been living on this old street for ten years.
Greg: Next is connaître, which means means to know.
Mailys: In lesson 8, we introduced the verb ‘savoir’, which also means “to know”. So, for one English verb, there are two in French.
Greg: Let's have a quick look at the conjugation, then let's see how you can determine which verb to use.
Mailys
je connais
tu connais
il connaît
nous connaissons
vous connaissez
ils connaissent
Greg: The verb ‘connaître’ is always used with a noun.
Mailys: Here are some examples. Est-ce que tu connais Jacques?
Greg: Do you know Jacques?
Mailys: Elle ne connaît pas cette rue.
Greg: She doesn't know that street.
Greg: ‘Savoir’, on the other hand, can be used in three different situations. First, it can be used alone, as in-
Mailys: Je sais, je sais.
Greg: I know, I know.
Greg: Second, it can be used with a verb in the infinitive-
Mailys: Il sait faire la cuisine.
Greg: He knows how to cook.
Mailys: Elle ne sait pas nager.
Greg: “She can't swim” or “She doesn't know how to swim.”
Greg: Third, it can be used with ‘que’ and a sentence-
Mailys: Sais-tu que Jacques a une copine?
Greg: Do you know that Jacques has a girlfriend?
Mailys: Nous savons tous qu'apprendre une langue est difficile.
Greg: We all know that learning a language is difficult. Ok, and with that, let’s move on to the grammar.

Lesson focus

Mailys: The focus of this lesson is the pronoun ‘en’ and how to form adverbs.
Greg: We learned about direct and indirect object pronouns in previous lessons.
Mailys: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the pronoun ‘en’, which replaces any noun introduced by the preposition ‘de’.
Greg: Like all other pronouns, ‘en’ precedes the verb. There is no similar word in English.
Mailys: For instance, if you say ‘je parle du film.’
Greg: I'm talking about the movie,
Mailys: you can replace ‘du film’ with ‘en’ - ‘j'en parle’
Greg: I'm talking about it. To understand when to use ‘en’, you have to pay attention to the French verb; you can't rely on the English translation. Here are a few more examples.
Mailys: Tu parles de ton ami
Greg: “you talk about your friend” becomes
Mailys: tu en parles
Greg: you talk about it
Mailys: Il arrive du marché
Greg: “He's arriving from the market” becomes
Mailys: il en arrive
Greg: he's arriving from there
Mailys: Elle écoute du jazz
Greg: “She listens to jazz” becomes
Mailys: Elle en écoute
Greg: “She's listening to it” or “She’s listening to some”.
Greg: Another case where ‘en’ is very common is when replacing a noun that follows a number.
Mailys: For instance, ‘je veux trois roses.’
Greg: “I want three roses” becomes
Mailys: j'en veux trois
Greg: “I want three.” While English can simply omit the noun, in French, it has to be replaced with ‘en’.
Mailys: Est-ce que tu veux des biscuits?
Greg: Do you want cookies?
Mailys: Merci, mais j'en veux seulement un.
Greg: Thanks, but I only want one.
Mailys: Avez-vous des roses?
Greg: Do you have roses?
Mailys: J'en prends une douzaine.
Greg: “I'll have a dozen.” Here ‘une douzaine de rose’ becomes ‘une douzaine’ and ‘de rose’ becomes ‘en’.
Mailys: Si vous avez du café, j'aimerais en acheter 300 grammes.
Greg: If you have coffee, I'd like to buy 300 grams.
Greg: In lesson 11, the adjective ‘dernier’ meaning “last” was introduced. In this lesson, we find the word ‘dernièrement’ meaning “lately”.
Mailys: As you can see, ‘dernièrement’ is made up of the feminine form of the ‘dernier’ and ‘-ment’, which is equivalent to the English “-ly”.
Greg: This is the most common way to form adverbs in French. Here are some examples.
Mailys: ‘seul’ becomes ‘seulement’, which means “only.”
Greg: ‘exact’ becomes ‘exactement’, exactly
Mailys: ‘heureux’ becomes ‘heureusement’ which means “happily” or “luckily”.
Greg: Make sure you read the lesson notes for more examples.
Greg: And that’s it for this lesson! Join us for lesson 21 to find out how Jacques' meeting with Mireille's parents will go!
Mailys: À bientôt!
Greg: See you soon!

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FrenchPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi everyone!

Do you know any other French adverbs? Please share!

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moh
Sunday at 1:15 am
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bonjour

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moh
Sunday at 1:14 am
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bon jour

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Auden
Monday at 8:41 am
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How come Marcel says "ça a l’air de bien aller" and not "ça a l’air d'aller bien"? I thought that the adverbs come after the verbs. Or is there an exception I missed?