Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Virginie: Hello, everyone, bonjour, Virginie here.
Eric: Eric here. Get What You Want Using French.
Virginie: Welcome, how are you doing, Eric?
Eric: I am great. How are you doing today?
Virginie: I am good. Thank you. What are we going to see in this lesson?
Eric: Well, it looks like Joe gets a ticket to go from the airport to his hotel.
Virginie: Oh yes. And the conversation is taking place at the CDG airport.
Eric: Great. Let’s have a listen to the dialogue.

Lesson conversation

Vendeur de ticket: Bonjour.
Joe : Je vais aux Invalides. À quelle heure est le bus ?
Vendeur : 10h30.
Joe : D'accord. Un ticket, s'il vous plaît.
Vendeur : Cinq euros. Liquide ou carte ?
Joe : Carte.
Vendeur : Signez, s'il vous plaît.
Joe : Le reçu, s'il vous plaît.
Vendeur : Voici le reçu et le ticket. Arrêt quai numéro six, à dix heures et demi.
Joe : Merci.
Vendeur : Au revoir !
Joe : Au revoir !
Eric: One more time, a little more slowly.
Virginie: Encore une fois, plus lentement.
Vendeur de ticket : Bonjour.
Joe : Je vais aux Invalides. À quelle heure est le bus ?
Vendeur : 10h30.
Joe : D'accord. Un ticket, s'il vous plaît.
Vendeur : Cinq euros. Liquide ou carte ?
Joe : Carte.
Vendeur : Signez, s'il vous plaît.
Joe : Le reçu, s'il vous plaît.
Vendeur : Voici le reçu et le ticket. Arrêt quai numéro six, à dix heures et demi.
Joe : Merci.
Vendeur : Au revoir !
Joe : Au revoir !
Eric: One more time, with the translation.
Virginie: Encore une fois, avec la traduction.
Vendeur de ticket : Bonjour.
Eric: Hello.
Joe : Je vais aux Invalides. À quelle heure est le bus ?
Eric: I go to the Invalides. At what time is the bus?
Vendeur : 10h30.
Eric: Ten-thirty.
Joe : D'accord. Un ticket, s'il vous plaît.
Eric: Okay. A ticket, please.
Vendeur : Cinq euros. Liquide ou carte ?
Eric: One euro sixty. Cash or card?
Joe : Carte.
Eric: Card.
Vendeur : Signez, s'il vous plaît.
Eric: Sign, please.
Joe : Le reçu, s'il vous plaît.
Eric: The receipt, please.
Vendeur : Voici le reçu et le ticket. Arrêt quai numéro six, à dix heures et demi.
Eric: Here is the receipt and the ticket. It stops at quay number six at ten-thirty.
Joe : Merci.
Eric: Thank you.
Vendeur : Au revoir !
Eric: Bye!
Joe : Au revoir !
Eric: Bye!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: So Joe is going to the Invalides.
Virginie: Oui, aux Invalides He is going to the Invalides. Do you know what the Invalides are?
Eric: What are they?
Virginie: They used to be a military hospital under Louie XIV.
Eric: I see.
Virginie: Yes, and now it’s – it turned into a museum, and also, Napoleon Bonaparte is buried there.
Eric: Well, so it sounds like Joe is staying in a pretty nice neighborhood.
Virginie: Yes, it is. Have you been there?
Eric: I have.
Virginie: Aha! Yeah, the park is really nice.
Eric: Very lovely, and it’s right by the Seine River as well.
Virginie: Yes. So it’s a nice – well, I would recommend it.
Eric: Okay. So let’s move on to some vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Virginie: un numéro [natural native speed]
Eric: a number
Virginie: un numéro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un numéro [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: quel/quelle/quels/quelles [natural native speed]
Eric: which, what
Virginie: quel/quelle/quels/quelles [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: quel/quelle/quels/quelles [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: une heure [natural native speed]
Eric: an hour
Virginie: une heure [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: une heure [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: un bus [natural native speed]
Eric: a bus
Virginie: un bus [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un bus [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: un ticket [natural native speed]
Eric: a ticket
Virginie: un ticket [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un ticket [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: un euro [natural native speed]
Eric: one euro
Virginie: un euro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un euro [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: une carte [natural native speed]
Eric: menu, map, card
Virginie: une carte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: une carte [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: un reçu [natural native speed]
Eric: a receipt
Virginie: un reçu [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un reçu [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: un arrêt de bus [natural native speed]
Eric: a bus stop
Virginie: un arrêt de bus [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un arrêt de bus [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: une ligne [natural native speed]
Eric: a line
Virginie: une ligne [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: une ligne [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: aller à/au/aux/à la/ à l' [natural native speed]
Eric: to go to
Virginie: aller à/au/aux/à la/ à l' [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: aller à/au/aux/à la/ à l' [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: un [natural native speed]
Eric: a, an
Virginie: un [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: ou [natural native speed]
Eric: or
Virginie: ou [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: ou [natural native speed]
: Next:
Virginie: six [natural native speed]
Eric: six
Virginie: six [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: six [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Virginie: The first word/phrase we’ll look at is....
Virginie: Let's take a look at arret de bus
Eric: this is a bus stop.
Virginie: yes arret is "stop"; and bus is bus
Eric: Now there is the little "de" in between.
Virginie: Yes, oui, and it's very important.
Eric: So here in English you have two nouns and the purpose of one of them is to complete the other one
Virginie: Right, a bus stop. The word bus specifies what kind of stop it is.
Eric: In French to say that you only need to use "de" between the two nouns.
Virginie: De meaning "of the" literally.
Eric: so arret de bus is literally "stop of the bus"
Virginie: Yes, here "bus" is a complement du nom
Eric: A noun complement
Virginie: How would we say for example "a subway stop"?
Eric: We would say "un arret de metro.
Virginie: Metro being, this time, the complement du nom.
Eric: There are plenty of nice arrets de metro in Paris
Virginie: Yes Paris' subway stops have all been renovated and they look very nice.
Eric: Now what's our second word?
Virginie: It is the word carte
Eric: and that's what a cashier will ask you whenever you make a purchase.
Virginie: It means card
Eric: And that could be either a credit or a debit card.
Virginie: Yes, une carte.
Eric: What are other means of payment Virginie?
Virginie: well in the dialog the sales person also says "liquide" meaning "argent liquide"
Eric: And "argent liquide" that means cash. Literally "liquid money.
Virginie: Yes, cash as opposed to card or checks. You can say either "liquide" or "argent liquide"
Eric: Now you probably noticed that the word liquide sounds like liquid...
Virginie: Oui, probably because cash is more going all over the place than a squared card or check
Eric: Aha I see. Silly French word here.
Virginie: I know and there are so many other ways to say "money” in French.
Eric: Could you give us one?
Virginie: Yes, le fric, par example. It's slang.
Eric: Le fric.
Virginie: Le fric, c'est chic. anyway.
Eric: OK let's look at one last word...
Virginie: An easy one, euro.
Eric: The EU currency, the euro.
Virginie: Yes so un euro is one euro, deux euro is two euros.
Eric: Etc.
Virginie: YEah. Sounded strange at first when we switched from Francs to Euros.
Eric: Oh yeah.
Virginie: It was hard even just to pronounce it. Euro. And when you say l'euro it sounds the same as "the burp"
Eric: Ahaha really?
Virginie: Yes. Ok grammar now.

Lesson focus

Eric: The focus of this lesson is indicating a destination with the verb aller "to go"
Virginie: we will also talk about how to ask what time it is
Eric: In the dialog to express his destination, Joe tells the seller Je vais aux Invalides.
Virginie: "I go to the Invalides."
Eric: To indicate a destination, use the correct verb form of aller "to go" with the preposition à followed by the correct definite article.le la or l'
virginie: yes the preposition "a" varies depending on the gender of your destination.
Eric: Let's take the feminine word piscine
Virginie: swimming pool. Je vais a la piscine
Eric: I am going/I go to the swimming pool
Virginie: Once again it's "je vais"
Eric: I am going
Virginie: A
Eric: to
Virginie: la piscine
Eric: the swimming pool.
Virginie: Now with a masculine word, like the word "cinema", it gets a little tricky.
Eric: Yeah if we follow the rule verb aller + a + article, it would be?
Virginie: Instead of being Je vais a le cinema, it will be…
Eric: Je vais au cinéma.
Virginie: Yeah, so the preposition a and the article le turn into one word, “au.”
Eric: This contraction just makes the sentences flow a little more naturally. Je vais au cinéma.
Virginie: Now, your destination might start with a vowel. For example…
Eric: "ecole", School.
Virginie: So in that case, no matter what gender the noun is, you will use the preposition a followed by the article l'
Eric: L' is le or la in front of any word starting with a vowel.
Virginie: So I go to school is je vais a l'ecole.
Eric: Once again.
Virginie: Je vais
Eric: I go
Virginie: To
Eric: a
Virginie: L'ecole
Eric: school.
Virginie: Ok hopefully you're not too tired out and ready for the last way of saying where you're going
Eric: OK the last one is actually the one from our dialog
Virginie: Joe says
Eric: And Les Invalides is a plural noun
Virginie: Right. And the proper preposition you will use is "aux"
Eric: SPELL
Virginie: Je vais aux Invalides.
Eric: I'm going to the invalides
Virginie: No matter the gender, if it's plural, it's going to be "aux"
eric: Ok now wherever you're going, you will know how to say it!
Virginie: Now is time to talk about the time...
Eric: Ahah. Yes with the question "a quelle heure est le bus?
Virginie: At what time is the bus?
Eric: Literally it is "at which hour is the bus?” meaning "at what time is the bus?”
Virginie:
Eric: How do you say that Virginie?
Virginie: It's quelle heure il est?
Eric: Oh I see it's just quelle then heure and then it and then elle.
Virginie: OK again, if you want to say "at what time is the movie?”
Eric: You will say "A (insist on the A) quelle heure est le film?
Virginie: And if you want to ask for the time, you say Quelle heure il est?
Eric: "What time is it?”

Outro

Virginie: Ok, thank you for listening!
Eric: Thank you very much!
Virginie: Bye, Eric. See you later.
Eric: Take care, Virginie.
Virginie: Bye-bye!

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