Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Introduction
Virginie: Bonjour!
Eric: Bonjour! Eric here, Gengo French, Lesson 19. Five Places You Have To See in Paris.
Virginie: Hi, this is Virginie and I am here with Eric.
Eric: How are you, Virginie?
Virginie: I am good, thank you. How are you?
Eric: Great.
Virginie: So what are we going to see in this lesson?
Eric: Well, we are going to be looking at the futur proche, which is one of the future tenses in French.
Virginie: And we are going to also talk about the verb vouloir, to want.
Eric: So, it looks like Joe and the gang are returning from their outing and they want to talk about what’s going on in Paris for the next week.
Virginie: So the conversation is between Joe, Frank, and the manager Madame Bertrand.
Eric: C'est parti! Let’s have a listen.
Dialogue
Joe : Encore merci !
Frank : Donc, Joe, qu'est-ce que tu fais cette semaine ?
Joe : Je ne sais pas encore. Lundi et mardi, je vais chez les amis de mes parents, donc j'ai mercredi, jeudi et vendredi. Je veux aller au Louvre.
Frank : Le Louvre, c'est super ! Tu vas aller au Centre Pompidou ?
Joe : Sûrement. Je veux vraiment y aller.
Frank : Et la Cité des Sciences ?
Joe : Peut-être, mais je ne sais pas. C'est un peu loin.
Franck : Et Montmartre ?
Joe : Sûrement pas. Je voudrais bien, mais je n'ai pas le temps.
Bertrand : Oh ! Et l'Institut du Monde Arabe ?
Joe : Qu'est-ce que c'est ?
Bertrand : C'est un musée sur la culture arabe dans le monde.
Eric: One more time, a little more slowly.
Joe : Encore merci !
Frank : Donc, Joe, qu'est-ce que tu fais cette semaine ?
Joe : Je ne sais pas encore. Lundi et mardi, je vais chez les amis de mes parents, donc j'ai mercredi, jeudi et vendredi. Je veux aller au Louvre.
Frank : Le Louvre, c'est super ! Tu vas aller au Centre Pompidou ?
Joe : Sûrement. Je veux vraiment y aller.
Frank : Et la Cité des Sciences ?
Joe : Peut-être, mais je ne sais pas. C'est un peu loin.
Franck : Et Montmartre ?
Joe : Sûrement pas. Je voudrais bien, mais je n'ai pas le temps.
Bertrand : Oh ! Et l'Institut du Monde Arabe ?
Joe : Qu'est-ce que c'est ?
Bertrand : C'est un musée sur la culture arabe dans le monde.
Eric: One more time, with the translation.
Joe : Encore merci !
Eric: Thank you again!
Frank : Donc, Joe, qu'est-ce que tu fais cette semaine ?
Eric: So, Joe, what are you doing this week?
Joe : Je ne sais pas encore. Lundi et mardi, je vais chez les amis de mes parents, donc j'ai mercredi, jeudi et vendredi. Je veux aller au Louvre.
Eric: I don't know yet. On Monday and Tuesday, I'm going to my parents' friends, so I have Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. I want to go to the Louvre.
Frank : Le Louvre, c'est super ! Tu vas aller au Centre Pompidou ?
Eric: The Louvre is great! Will you go to the Pompidou Center?
Joe : Sûrement. Je veux vraiment y aller.
Eric: Probably. I really want to go.
Frank : Et la Cité des Sciences ?
Eric: What about the City of Science?
Joe : Peut-être, mais je ne sais pas. C'est un peu loin.
Eric: Maybe, but I don't know. It's a little far.
Franck : Et Montmartre ?
Eric: And Montmartre?
Joe : Sûrement pas. Je voudrais bien, mais je n'ai pas le temps.
Eric: Probably not. I would like to, but I don't have time.
Bertrand : Oh ! Et l'Institut du Monde Arabe ?
Eric: Oh! What about the Arabic World Institute?
Joe : Qu'est-ce que c'est ?
Eric: What is this?
Bertrand : C'est un musée sur la culture arabe dans le monde.
Eric: It's a museum about Arabic culture in the world.
Post Conversation Banter
Virginie: So, it looks like Joe is going to go to a lot of places this week, right, Eric?
Eric: Yeah. He has a very what we would call a planning chargé.
Virginie: Planning chargé, busy schedule for sure. Where is he going to go again, to the city of science?
Eric: Right and that’s one of the largest science museums in Europe, right?
Virginie: Yes it is. It’s in Paris obviously. It’s called La cité des sciences, and it’s in the 19th arrondissement. Eric, have you been to the city of science when you were in France?
Eric: I never made it there, but next time.
Virginie: It’s really interesting. They have all these…
Eric: Really?
Virginie: Yeah. It’s museum specialized in technique, science, and industry, and they have a lot of interesting exhibits. Last year, I saw an exhibit called Epidemic and it was about epidemics all over the world and how they spread and…
Eric: Wow, like the Bubonic plague or something?
Virginie: Yes exactly. It was really interesting and it’s very interactive. It’s really it’s great for children, too.
Eric: What about l'Institut du Monde Arabe?
Virginie: Yes, The Arab World Institute. That’s an interesting place too. It’s not very well known by the tourists, I think.
Eric: But it’s really interesting. I was there once.
Virginie: Oh, you have been there?
Eric: Yeah. They have – their architecture is really interesting because it’s sort of like a large modern building. They have sort of like the Arabic style prince on the -
Virginie: Yeah, on the walls.
Eric: Right.
Virginie: Yeah, you can see them from the outside.
Eric: It’s great.
Virginie: Yeah it’s like a melange of old and modern.
Eric: Exactly. It’s very cool.
Virginie: So l'Institut du Monde Arabe, the Arab World Institute was meant to educate the public about the Arab world cultural and spiritual values in France, which is very important because we have a strong Arab and Muslim community.
Eric: What about the Georges Pompidou Center?
Virginie: Oh, the Georges Pompidou Center is the Museum of Modern art.
Eric: Right, and it’s pretty amazing architecture as well.
Virginie: Yeah. Great architecture and they have a great programmation too, great exhibits and movies, too.
Eric: That’s a must see, I would say, if you are in Paris.
Virginie: Yes, definitely.
Eric: Okay, great. So let’s move on to little vocabulary.
Vocab List
Virginie: une semaine [natural native speed]
Eric: a week
Virginie: une semaine [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: une semaine [natural native speed]
Virginie: lundi [natural native speed]
Eric: Monday
Virginie: lundi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: lundi [natural native speed]
Virginie: mardi [natural native speed]
Eric: Tuesday
Virginie: mardi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: mardi [natural native speed]
Virginie: mercredi [natural native speed]
Eric: Wednesday
Virginie: mercredi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: mercredi [natural native speed]
Virginie: jeudi [natural native speed]
Eric: Thursday
Virginie: jeudi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: jeudi [natural native speed]
Virginie: vendredi [natural native speed]
Eric: Friday
Virginie: vendredi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: vendredi [natural native speed]
Virginie: un(e) ami(e) [natural native speed]
Eric: a friend
Virginie: un(e) ami(e) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un(e) ami(e) [natural native speed]
Virginie: les parents [natural native speed]
Eric: parents
Virginie: les parents [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: les parents [natural native speed]
Virginie: un jour [natural native speed]
Eric: a day
Virginie: un jour [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un jour [natural native speed]
Virginie: vouloir [natural native speed]
Eric: to want
Virginie: vouloir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: vouloir [natural native speed]
Virginie: chez [natural native speed]
Eric: at (someone's home)
Virginie: chez [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: chez [natural native speed]
Virginie: encore [natural native speed]
Eric: yet, again
Virginie: encore [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: encore [natural native speed]
Virginie: peut-être [natural native speed]
Eric: maybe
Virginie: peut-être [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: peut-être [natural native speed]
Virginie: sûrement [natural native speed]
Eric: probably, surely
Virginie: sûrement [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: sûrement [natural native speed]
Virginie: avoir le temps [natural native speed]
Eric: to have time
Virginie: avoir le temps [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: avoir le temps [natural native speed]
Vocab and Phrase Usage
Virginie: What are we going to see today as far as vocabulary, Eric?
Eric: Let's take a look at "sûrement" and "surement pas"
Virginie: In our dialogue, Joe answers "surement" when he’s asked if he's going to visit the Louvres.
Eric: Surement means "probably."
Virginie: And in a sentence, it will be placed after the verb,
Eric: the same way toujours, “always,” is placed after the verb as we say in a previous lesson.
Virginie: For example, "je suis surement malade."
Eric: I am probably sick.
Virginie: It’s right after the verb, right after "suis". Je suis surement malade."
Eric: Now, Joe also says "sûrement pas" at another point in the dialogue.
Virginie: Oh yes, that's when they ask him if he's going to the cite des sciences
Eric: Surement pas can have two meanings depending on the context.
Virginie: The first meaning, from our dialogue, is "probably not"
Eric: Pas, as you remember, means “not”.
Virginie: So sûrement pas means "probably not". And what is the other meaning, Eric?
Eric: It can also mean "certainly not"
Virginie: That’s different, people usually say "sûrement pas" when they want to say "are you crazy? certainly not!"
Eric: That’s a little more directly related to the English word “surely,” like “surely not”. But keep in mind that it can mean "probably not" too. Sûrement pas. Do you have an example, maybe, in mind?
Virginie: yes, what if I ask you, did you drink any alcohol for breakfast, Eric?
Eric: Alcohol for breakfast? Sûrement pas!
Virginie: "Certainly not!” No alcohol for breakfast, of course. Now, when Frank asks Joe whether he's going to Montmartre, not only does Joe say "sûrement pas, he also says "je n'ai pas le temps"
Eric: And that's "I don't have time."
Virginie: So the expression for "to have time" or “to have the time” in French is avoir le temps. The verb avoir "to have" is followed by "le temps", time.
Eric: Ok, very straightforward.
Virginie: If you want to say "I have time", you will say "j'ai le temps.”
Eric: And that's j'ai, which is “I have,” and then followed by "le temps", the time.
Virginie: And Joe uses this expression in the negative form.
Eric: Right, you can see the n’ and pas which are around the verb, which is "je n'ai pas le temps".
Virginie: Exactly, "je n'ai pas le temps". And remember the negative construction in French? Maybe we need a little review here.
Eric: Very simple, take the verb, just place the two words "ne" and "pas" around it, and the verb is negative.
Virginie: Now, let's try to say in a sentence, for example, I don't have time to work.
Eric: Je n'ai pas le temps de travailler.
Virginie: Exactly. Je n'ai pas le temps de travailler. It's je n'ai pas le temps, “I don’t have time,” then the preposition "de", and then your infinitive verb, here it’s "travailler".
Eric: Mais j'ai le temps de manger.
Virginie: What Eric said is - but I have time to eat.
Eric: So, do we have time for one last word?
Virginie: Bien sur. Of course. Let's have a quick look at "ami"
Eric: Right, so he says he's going to his parent's friends’ house.
Virginie: Rght. And he says - les amis de mes parents.
Eric: And that’s “friends” in the plural form.
Virginie: "les amis", that’s plural. A friend, one friend, is "un ami”...
Eric: That's masculine
Virginie: and une amie...
Eric: That's feminine, you’re gonna be adding an "e" at the end of the word.
Virginie: Yeah, even if you can’t hear it. For example, je vous presente Eric, un amie.
Eric: Or, je vous presente Virginie, une amie. And that means “I introduce you to a friend, Virginie (or, Eric).”
Eric: OK. So let's get into some grammar.

Lesson focus

Virginie: The focus of this lesson is how to speak in the future.
Eric: And then we're gonna talk about how to say what you want.
Virginie: Let's start with the future. In French, there are 2 future tenses.
Eric: And we’re gonna look at the more simple one, which is the futur proche.
Virginie: The futur proche is to express a future event that is not too far from the present.
Eric: Something that’s gonna happen in a near future.
Virginie: Can we give an example, Eric?
Eric: Well, you can say, for example, je vais manger. I am going to eat.
Virginie: Right, je vais manger. So our future proche here is vais manger.
Eric: And this construction here, is take the verb aller, which is “to go”, and you’re gonna conjugate that verb, then you’re gonna add on the infinitive for the action you’re going to do in the future.
Virginie: Exactly. It’s literally, I go…
Eric: To eat. So in English it should be more common to “I’m going to eat”.
Virginie: How would I say, “I’m going to work”?
Eric: je vais travailler.
Virginie: So it’s je vail, the verb aller conjugated with je, and then the infinitive form of the verb, which is travailler.
Eric: So it’s je vais, then…
Virginie: travailler.
Eric: je vais travailler.
Virginie: Ok, that’s pretty easy.
Eric: So we did have an example in our dialogue as well, right?
Virginie: Yes, but it’s a little tricky, because we’re saying “I'm going to go”.
Eric: So we’re using aller twice.
Virginie: So it’s je vais aller.
Eric: Frank asked Joe, “Tu vas aller au centre pompidou?”
Virginie: So that’s “Are you going to go to the pompidou center?”
Eric: So let's take a look at the construction here. First, we have tu...
Virginie: And that’s "you"
Eric: And then, we have the future proche, which is vas aller.
Virginie: Vas here is the conjugated form of the verb “to go,” aller, with tu.
Eric: And then we have the infinitive added next, so it’s tu vas aller.
Virginie: That’s right, “you’re going to go”. And Joe’s answers, as we said previously… Je vais aller, I’m going to go.
Eric: So again, Joe is expressing that he’s doing this in a near future, je vais aller. I’m going to go this week, maybe next week, but not a year from now. Let’s take a look at the verb “to want”, which is...
Virginie: vouloir
Eric: Yes. Joe tells Frank that he wants to go to the Louvre.
Virginie: Right, he says "je veux aller au Louvre."
Eric: I want to go to the louvre.
Virginie: What Joe says is really simple. He says je veux "I want"
Eric: Yes, and then he’s adding the infinitive form of the verb, aller, which is the action he wants to do, he wants to go, right after je veux, so..
Eric: Je veux aller.
Virginie: I want to go.
Eric: And finally, the destination. “je veux aller au Louvre."
Virginie: So again, it’s very easy, just conjugate the verb vouloir, to want,
Eric: and then you add what the action that you want to do.
Virginie: In the infinitive form. We’re gonna use the verb travailler as another example.
Eric: "je veux travailler," I want to work.
Virginie: Or “je veux manger,”
Eric: I want to eat.
Virginie: So the whole conjugation of vouloir will be in our lesson note for lesson #22.
Eric: Just know how to use vouloir with je is probably enough to get whatever you want from French people!
Virginie: Yes, especially if you want to escape from France. Now, you can say, je veux partir! I want to leave.
Eric: Why would anyone want to leave France?
Virginie: C'est vrai. It's true, Eric.

Outro

Virginie: Well I think we're done for this lesson.
Eric: Thank you for listening!
Virginie: Thank you! Merci! Bye-bye!
Eric: Au revoir.
Virginie: Au revoir.

4 Comments

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FrenchPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:40 PM
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Bonjour Andrew,

Tu as raison, cette année n'a pas été très facile. 😞


Bonne journée,

Marion

Team FrenchPod101

Andrew
Tuesday at 02:13 AM
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Epidemic? Ça n'a pas bien vieilli. Deux mille vingt était une année folle.

FrenchPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:39 AM
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Hello Amir,


Thank you for your comment ! That's a really good question.

Reflexive verbs in French are used where in English the object of the verb is a -self word (myself, yourself, herself, ourselves...).


That's why you have to say "je veux m'arrêter au bistrot" => I want to stop (myself )at the pub".

With the verb "faire" you can say "Je veux me faire des pâtes" => I want to cook pasta (for myself)

But if you want to cook for all your family you will say : "je veux faire des pâtes pour la famille"


The verb faire + une activité (faire de la danse/ du vélo/ du roller) doesn't need a pronoun.


I hope everything is clear. If not let me know !


Have a nice day,

Marie Alice

Team FrenchPod101.com

Amir
Sunday at 04:50 AM
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Hi!


I really don understand the reflexive verb thing. When exactly are we supposed to apply it? Is it our own choice? for example in the lesson notes:


Je veux faire du vélo dans Paris. "I want to bike in Paris."

Je veux m'arrêter au bistrot. "I want to stop at the pub."


In the first example, the ref. verb is not used. But it is in the second one, why?

And how to distinguish?

Could I just have written "Je veux arreter au bistrot"?