Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

Introduction
Virginie: Bonjour tout le monde!
Eric: Bonjour! Eric here. Gengo Lesson 13. The Proper Way To Do Business in France.
Virginie: Hi, this is Virginie here. Hi Eric, how are you today?
Eric: I am very good. So what are we going to be looking at in this lesson?
Virginie: In this lesson, you will learn to describe someone and how things look, too.
Eric: It looks like Joe is going to be meeting an old colleague.
Virginie: The conversation takes place in the business office in Chanel in the morning.
Eric: Now, okay let’s have a listen.
Dialogue
Réceptionniste : Bonjour, et bienvenue chez Chanel.
Joe: Bonjour, j'ai rendez-vous avec Madame Fonta à 9h.
Réceptionniste : Votre nom ?
Joe: Joe McFly.
Réceptionniste: Un instant, Monsieur McFly.
(elevator music)
Réceptionniste : M. McFly, merci d'avoir patienté. Par ici.
Directrice : M. McFly, ça fait un bail !
Joe : Oui, ça fait longtemps. Trop longtemps ! Voici un petit quelque chose des Etats-Unis.
Directrice : Merci, vous n'auriez pas dû. Vous avez l'air en forme ! Comment ça va ?
Joe : Ça va bien. Et vous ? Vous avez l'air en forme aussi.
Directrice: Je vais très bien. Beaucoup de travail, mais ça va. Aujourd'hui c'est chargé. Très chargé. Vous êtes prêt ?
Joe : Oui.
Eric: One more time, a little more slowly.
Réceptionniste : Bonjour, et bienvenue chez Chanel.
Joe: Bonjour, j'ai rendez-vous avec Madame Fonta à 9h.
Réceptionniste : Votre nom ?
Joe: Joe McFly.
Réceptionniste: Un instant, Monsieur McFly.
(elevator music)
Réceptionniste : M. McFly, merci d'avoir patienté. Par ici.
Directrice : M. McFly, ça fait un bail !
Joe : Oui, ça fait longtemps. Trop longtemps ! Voici un petit quelque chose des Etats-Unis.
Directrice : Merci, vous n'auriez pas dû. Vous avez l'air en forme ! Comment ça va ?
Joe : Ça va bien. Et vous ? Vous avez l'air en forme aussi.
Directrice: Je vais très bien. Beaucoup de travail, mais ça va. Aujourd'hui c'est chargé. Très chargé. Vous êtes prêt ?
Joe : Oui.
Eric: One more time, with the translation.
Réceptionniste : Bonjour, et bienvenue chez Chanel.
Eric: Good morning, and welcome to Chanel.
Joe: Bonjour, j'ai rendez-vous avec Madame Fonta à 9h.
Eric: Hello, I have an appointment with Mrs. Fonta at nine o'clock in the morning.
Réceptionniste : Votre nom ?
Eric: Your name?
Joe: Joe McFly.
Eric: Joe McFly.
Réceptionniste: Un instant, Monsieur McFly.
Eric: Just a moment, Mr. McFly.
(elevator music)
Eric(elevator music)
Réceptionniste : M. McFly, merci d'avoir patienté. Par ici.
Eric: Mr. McFly, thank you for waiting. This way.
Directrice : M. McFly, ça fait un bail!
Eric: Mr. McFly, it's been a while!
Joe : Oui, ça fait longtemps. Trop longtemps ! Voici un petit quelque chose des Etats-Unis.
Eric: Yes, it's been a while. Too long! Here's a little something from the United States.
Directrice : Merci, vous n'auriez pas dû. Vous avez l'air en forme ! Comment ça va ?
Eric: Thank you, you shouldn't have. You look great! How are you?
Joe : Ça va bien. Et vous ? Vous avez l'air en forme aussi.
Eric: I'm fine. And you? You also look good.
Directrice: Je vais très bien. Beaucoup de travail, mais ça va. Aujourd'hui c'est chargé. Très chargé. Vous êtes prêt ?
Eric: I'm very good. A lot of work, but good. Today is busy. Very busy. Are you ready?
Joe : Oui.
Eric: Yes.
Post Conversation Banter
Eric: Well, so it looks like Chanel is a pretty big company obviously.
Virginie: It is a big company and I think Joe is going to be very stressed out. He has a very, very busy schedule, yes.
Eric: So Joe is obviously some kind of high powered executive I guess.
Virginie: He is a marketing consultant.
Eric: Wow!
Virginie: Actually and he works for Chanel.
Eric: So what is the work life like in France is compared to the US?
Virginie: Well, it seems that people tend to work less than in the US and French people have this reputation of, you know, not working a lot but they are very productive.
Eric: So the French work week is typically 35 hours a week but obviously for people who are management or a lot of other jobs, it goes way beyond that.
Virginie: Yeah definitely.
Eric: But 35 hours is still pretty nice.
Virginie: It is pretty nice and also usually people get five-week vacation per year in France.
Eric: Wow, that’s great.
Virginie: Yeah that’s the minimum they get.
Eric: I remember I once met somebody who is a gendarme, a French policeman, and he told me he got eight weeks of vacation a year.
Virginie: That’s true, yeah, public jobs are really, really good in terms of vacation.
Eric: Wow! He was telling me it was a difficult challenge to take all his vacation time.
Virginie: Yeah, that’s the challenge in France. Yeah, managing your vacation and yeah, if you work in a library for instance, in public library, you get 13 weeks.
Eric: 13 weeks off?
Virginie: Yes. Yeah, that’s really, really nice.
Eric: Why do librarians have it so good?
Virginie: I don’t know. We should ask them. I am not a librarian but they are lucky. That’s for sure. Okay, why don’t we look at the vocabulary?
Vocabulary and Phrases
Eric: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Virginie: un rendez-vous [natural native speed]
Eric: a date, an appointment
Virginie: un rendez-vous [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un rendez-vous [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: avec [natural native speed]
Eric: with
Virginie: avec [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: avec [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: un instant [natural native speed]
Eric: a moment, an instant
Virginie: un instant [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un instant [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: patienter [natural native speed]
Eric: to wait
Virginie: patienter [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: patienter [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: longtemps [natural native speed]
Eric: long
Virginie: longtemps [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: longtemps [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: quelque chose [natural native speed]
Eric: something
Virginie: quelque chose [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: quelque chose [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: Les États-Unis [natural native speed]
Eric: The United States
Virginie: Les États-Unis [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: Les États-Unis [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: bien [natural native speed]
Eric: well, good
Virginie: bien [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: bien [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: beaucoup de travail [natural native speed]
Eric: lots of work
Virginie: beaucoup de travail [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: beaucoup de travail [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: chargé(e) [natural native speed]
Eric: busy, in charge
Virginie: chargé(e) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: chargé(e) [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: un jour [natural native speed]
Eric: a day
Virginie: un jour [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: un jour [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: lire [natural native speed]
Eric: to read
Virginie: lire [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: lire [natural native speed]: Next:
Virginie: par ici [natural native speed]
Eric: over here
Virginie: par ici [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Virginie: par ici [natural native speed]
Vocabulary and Phrase Usage
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Virginie: The first word/phrase we’ll look at is....
Virginie: Alright I would like to start with the end of the dialogue, actually.
Eric: Sure.
Virginie: Yes, after they exchanged greetings, etc, Madame Fonta asks "vous etes prets"
Eric: And that means "are you ready? or ready?
Virginie: You probably recognized vous etes
Eric: The formal "you are"
Virginie: And then pret is ready.
Eric: but if I ask Virginie if she's ready it will be slightly different, because she's a girl.
Virginie: Yes, pret is an adjective, so it agrees to the gender
Eric: It will be "virginie, tu es prete?
Virginie: OOui, je suis prete. Also note that Eric used the informal you, "tu"
Eric: Because Virginie is my friend.
Virginie: Let's take a look at Un rendez-vous.
Eric: ah this one is interesting because usually people think it only means a date
Virginie: Yes like a romantic date. Well, no! I mean, it means a date in certain contexts.
Eric: But rendez-vous can also mean an appointment
Virginie: Eh oui! For example, j'ai rendez-vous chez le dentiste
Eric: I have an appointment at the dentist's
Virginie: Or you can use it when you meet a friend, j'ai rendez-vous avec Dominique
Eric: I am meeting Dominique
Virginie: But if you say, by itsself "j'ai un rendez-vous cesoir" it sounds like it's date.
Eric: So, in the end, when you use the article "un" ibefore rendez-vous that means a date.
Virginie: Oui, and if you use it without the article "j'ai rendez-vous avec" I am meeting with
Eric: OK. Good to know.
Virginie: OK one last word maybe? which one would you pick
Eric: There are so many words here...let's talk about the phrase in our dialogue "ca fait longtemps"
Virginie: Oh yes it can be very useful. what does ca fait longtemps mean Eric?
Eric: It means "it's been a while/a long time
Virginie: Let's break it down - ca is it and then fait is makes and finally longtemps is "long"
Eric: Long or a long time
Virginie: Oui. Ca fait longtemps.
Eric: So if you haven't seen a french person in a long time, just say "ca fait longtemps. A word on "ca fait un bail"
Virginie: Oui. C'est tres bien. Very good. Let's do some grammar

Lesson focus

Virginie: The focus of this lesson is describing a person's appearance with avoir láir and the adverb très Je vais très bien."I'm very well."
Eric: So let's start with avoir l'air
Virginie: That's the infinitive of the verb avoir (to have) + l'air (spell)
Eric: That means, to look, to seem
Virginie: But also to sound
Eric: In our dialog Madame Fonta says "vous avez l'air en forme!
Virginie: If we break it down we have the expression avoir l'air conjugated with vous, "vous avez l'air
Eric: And then we have "en forme", which means great or good, when talking about a person
Virginie: Yes. Literally "en forme" means "in shape" .Vous avez l'air en forme.
Eric: Virginie tu as l'air en forme.
Virginie: Merci eric. Je vais bien.
Eric: Virginie just said "I am well
Virginie: And to do so, I used the verb aller, I said je vais literally "I go"
Eric: And then the adverb "bien", which means well.
virginie: But...there are plenty of ways to say you are well. Madame Fonta uses one of them in our dialogue
Eric: Yes she says "je vais tres bien"
Virginie: I am very well. She added the little adverb tres
Eric: And that's "very". Tres bien is very well.
Virginie: Let's see how Joe says he's doing well now.
Eric: He says, "ca va bien"
Virginie: Literally "it goes well"
Eric: Ca , "it", then "va" goes, and finally "bien", well.
Virginie: Let's have a quick recap here - Je vais bien
Eric: I qm well
Virginie: Je vais tres bien
Eric: I am very well
Virginie: And...ca va bien.
Eric: It goes well
Virginie: Woo. That's a lot of ways to say you're well.
Eric: OK now let's go back to avoir l'air, I have the feeling we're not done with it
Virginie: Yes. We're going to give you other examples of how you can use the expression "avoir l'air"
Eric: We already saw vous avez l'air/tu as l'air meaning "you look"
Virginie: Now in another context. Let's imagine a friend tells you about a movie.
Eric: ANd this movie sounds great.
virginie: You will then tell your friend" the movie sounds good"
Eric: Le film a l'air bien.
Virginie: same thing than previously. Le film is your subject
Eric: And that's the movie
Virginie: then you conjugate avoir l'air. Le film a - l'air
Eric: And finally you have the adverb "bien", good.
Virginie: again, le film a l'air bien
Eric: the movie seems good.
Virginie: So avoir l'air works for people and for things.

Outro

Eric: OK that's it for today I think.
Virginie: Oui. Merci! Thank you for listening!

5 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Siana
Friday at 1:26 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

De rien Agagooga ^^

Agagooga
Sunday at 12:37 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Merci Siana

Siana
Friday at 12:15 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Agagooga!

Thanks for your comments.


You can say both^^.


For the first sentence it has a more general meaning, that can be understood as I have an appointment, so I'm busy now or I have to go see my friends or whatever. But you didn't specified.


In the second case you just specified is this a specific appointment " I finally succeed to have an appointment with the doctor!). It's underline the fact that's just one.


Also in some case you can't omit the article: j'ai un rendez-vous galant! you can't say j'ai rendez-vous galant O___o


Hope that helped you ^^

Agagooga
Sunday at 3:05 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Pourquoi "j'ai rendez-vous" et pas "j'ai un rendez-vous" ?