Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Maryssa: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FrenchPod101.com. This is Business French for Beginners Season 1 Lesson 7 - Leaving the Office At the End of the Day. Maryssa Here.
Laurent: Bonjour, I'm Laurent.
Maryssa: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask for permission, and also leave-taking expressions. The conversation takes place at the office.
Laurent: It's between Laurène and Thomas.
Maryssa: The speakers are co-workers, therefore, they will speak both formal and informal French. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Laurène: Je n'avais pas vu l'heure, mais il est tard !
Thomas: En effet il est déjà 20 heures ! Mais je n'ai pas encore fini mon rapport.
Laurène: Ce n'est pas grave ne t'en fais pas. Tu peux le faire demain. Tu peux y aller.
Thomas: Je peux partir ? Ce n'est pas un problème ?
Laurène: Bien sûr que non ! Vas-y ! Et demain j'espère que tu ne finiras pas aussi tard.
Thomas: Et bien dans ce cas j'y vais ! Et vous ?
Laurène: Ne t'en fais pas je ne vais pas tarder non plus. Bonne soirée, rentre bien !
Thomas: Merci, bonne soirée également !
Maryssa: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Laurène: Je n'avais pas vu l'heure, mais il est tard !
Thomas: En effet il est déjà 20 heures ! Mais je n'ai pas encore fini mon rapport.
Laurène: Ce n'est pas grave ne t'en fais pas. Tu peux le faire demain. Tu peux y aller.
Thomas: Je peux partir ? Ce n'est pas un problème ?
Laurène: Bien sûr que non ! Vas-y ! Et demain j'espère que tu ne finiras pas aussi tard.
Thomas: Et bien dans ce cas j'y vais ! Et vous ?
Laurène: Ne t'en fais pas je ne vais pas tarder non plus. Bonne soirée, rentre bien !
Thomas: Merci, bonne soirée également !
Maryssa: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Laurène: I did not see the time, but it's late!
Thomas: Indeed it is already 8 PM! But I have not finished my report yet.
Laurène: It doesn't matter, don't worry. You can do it tomorrow. You can go.
Thomas: I can leave now? It's not a problem?
Laurène: Of course it isn't! Go! I hope you will not end so late tomorrow.
Thomas: Then I'm going! What about you?
Laurène: Don't worry; I'll leave soon. Good evening, get home safely!
Thomas: Thank you, good evening!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Maryssa: That was nice of Laurène! Even though Thomas hadn’t finished his work, he was still allowed to go.
Laurent: Well, it was past finishing time, and the report could wait until tomorrow.
Maryssa: Is there a limit on how many working hours people can work in France?
Laurent: Yes, it’s 35 hours.
Maryssa: Has it always been 35 hours?
Laurent: That limit was set in 2000.
Maryssa: The reduction in working hours definitely gives you a better quality of life.
Laurent: It helped the unemployment rate too.
Maryssa: What happens if someone goes over 35 hours?
Laurent: There is one of two things. The first is that they will get paid overtime.
Maryssa: What is the second?
Laurent: They can get RTT - Réduction du Temps de Travail
Maryssa: That is "compensatory time." Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Maryssa: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Laurent: heure [natural native speed]
Maryssa: "hour"
Laurent: heure [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Laurent: heure [natural native speed]
Maryssa: Next we have...
Laurent: tard [natural native speed]
Maryssa: "late"
Laurent: tard [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Laurent: tard [natural native speed]
Maryssa: Next we have...
Laurent: grave [natural native speed]
Maryssa: "serious"
Laurent: grave [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Laurent: grave [natural native speed]
Maryssa: Next we have...
Laurent: rapport [natural native speed]
Maryssa: "report"
Laurent: rapport [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Laurent: rapport [natural native speed]
Maryssa: Next we have...
Laurent: aller [natural native speed]
Maryssa: "to go"
Laurent: aller [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Laurent: aller [natural native speed]
Maryssa: Next we have...
Laurent: espérer [natural native speed]
Maryssa: "to hope"
Laurent: espérer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Laurent: espérer [natural native speed]
Maryssa: Next we have...
Laurent: tarder [natural native speed]
Maryssa: "to be late"
Laurent: tarder [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Laurent: tarder [natural native speed]
Maryssa: And last...
Laurent: bonne soirée [natural native speed]
Maryssa: "good evening"
Laurent: bonne soirée [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Laurent: bonne soirée [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Maryssa: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Laurent: ce n'est pas grave
Maryssa: meaning "it doesn't matter."
Maryssa: This is a sentence.
Laurent: The last word, grave, means "serious," or "gross."
Maryssa: But this is a negative sentence, so it means it isn’t serious.
Laurent: Right. There is C'est grave.
Maryssa: "It’s serious," or "It’s important."
Laurent: Whereas Ce n'est pas grave...
Maryssa: Means something like "no problem." Can you give us an example using this sentence?
Laurent: Sure. For example, you can say... Ce n'est pas grave si il pleut ce soir.
Maryssa: ...which means "It does not matter if it rains tonight."
Maryssa: Okay, what's the next word?
Laurent: Ne t'en fais pas.
Maryssa: meaning "Don't worry."
Maryssa: This is another sentence.
Laurent: t'en can be translated to "it."
Maryssa: So it means something like "don’t worry about it."
Laurent: You may also hear t'en fais pas in spoken French.
Maryssa: This has the same meaning.
Laurent: You’ll often hear French speakers shorten the phrase.
Maryssa: Can you give us an example using this sentence?
Laurent: Sure. For example, you can say... Ne t'en fais pas, tout va bien se passer.
Maryssa: ... which means "Do not worry, everything will be fine."
Maryssa: Okay, what's the next word?
Laurent: je n'avais pas vu l'heure
Maryssa: meaning "I did not see the time."
Maryssa: This is a phrase.
Laurent: In this sentence, avoir, is conjugated with the imparfait.
Maryssa: This is the "imperfect tense." The imperfect describes what was going on at an indefinite time in the past or what used to happen.
Laurent: This sentence is a common one in France. It’s used to talk about a day that’s going by quickly.
Maryssa: How do we talk about a boring day that goes by slowly?
Laurent: You can say le temps est passé trop lentement.
Maryssa: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Laurent: Sure. For example, you can say... Je n'avais pas vu l'heure, je suis en retard !
Maryssa: ... which means "I did not see the time, I'm late!"
Maryssa: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Maryssa: In this lesson, you'll learn how to ask for permission, and also some leave-taking expressions. In this lesson, as well as permission we’re going to look at other situations where you’d use "can" or "may."
Laurent: A common verb for this is pouvoir. It means "can," or "may."
Maryssa: There are different ways to use this verb. You can use it to show capacity to do something.
Laurent: The verb after pouvoir in this case must be in infinitive form.
Maryssa: Let’s hear an example.
Laurent: Je peux m’occuper de ce projet.
Maryssa: "I can handle this project."
Laurent: Nous pouvons réserver la salle de réunion.
Maryssa: "We can reserve the meeting room." If you want to show your knowledge, you can use a different verb.
Laurent: Yes, savoir with a verb in infinitive. For example, Je sais utiliser l’ordinateur.
Maryssa: "I can use the computer."
Laurent: Ils savent nager.
Maryssa: "They can swim." Next, let’s look at how to ask for something politely.
Laurent: We conjugate pouvoir into puis-je?
Maryssa: An example, please?
Laurent: Puis-je vous déranger 5 minutes ?
Maryssa: "May I bother you for 5 minutes?"
Laurent: Pouvez-vous m'apporter les documents?
Maryssa: "Can you bring me the files?" There are a few other examples in the lesson notes. Now, let’s move onto leave-taking expressions.
Laurent: In most cases, it will be enough to say just au-revoir or bonne soirée.
Maryssa: But if your colleagues are still working and don’t seem to be leaving soon, you can say something else.
Laurent: You can say J'y vais !
Maryssa: "I’m going!" What are some other things that can be said?
Laurent: J’ai fini mon travail pour aujourd’hui. A demain.
Maryssa: "I’ve completed all my tasks for today. I’ll see you tomorrow."
Laurent: C’est tout pour aujourd’hui. Au revoir
Maryssa: "I’m done for today. Bye."

Outro

Maryssa: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Laurent: A la prochaine!

3 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

FrenchPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Do you like working overtime? Try answering in French!

FrenchPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:55 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Bonjour Renee,

Merci pour ton commentaire ! 👍


Bonne journée,

Marion

Team FrenchPod101

Renee
Tuesday at 03:53 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Bon apprentissage à tous.