Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sam: Hello, and welcome back to the Beginner Series, Lesson 25. Yippee yey! And I’m joined here by….
Celine: Céline.
Sam: We’ve got a fantastic lesson today, but what’s the point of today’s conversation?
Celine: Today’s lesson is the follow-up of the past lesson.
Sam: Okay. So Beginner 24 and Beginner 25 are like a sandwich; one piece and now you have the second piece.
Celine: Oui. So with Rémi and Robert.
Sam: Okay. C’est parti!
Celine: C’est parti!
Sam: Let’s go.

Lesson conversation

Clever Robert: Continue, c’est joli.
Tiny Rémi: Août, vacances et sur les routes.
Tiny Rémi: Septembre, l’automne aux couleurs d'ambre.
Tiny Rémi: Octobre, la nature est sobre.
Tiny Rémi: Novembre, met ta robe de chambre.
Tiny Rémi: Décembre, grelotte de tous ses membres.
Sam: One more time, slowly.
Male: Encore une fois lentement.
Clever Robert: Continue, c’est joli.
Tiny Rémi: Août, vacances et sur les routes.
Tiny Rémi: Septembre, l’automne aux couleurs d'ambre.
Tiny Rémi: Octobre, la nature est sobre.
Tiny Rémi: Novembre, met ta robe de chambre.
Tiny Rémi: Décembre, grelotte de tous ses membres.
Sam: One more time, with the English.
Male: Encore une fois, avec l’anglais.
Clever Robert: Continue, c’est joli.
Sam: Go on, it’s lovely.
Tiny Rémi: Août, vacances et sur les routes.
Tiny Rémi: Septembre, l’automne aux couleurs d'ambre.
Tiny Rémi: Octobre, la nature est sobre.
Tiny Rémi: Novembre, met ta robe de chambre.
Tiny Rémi: Décembre, grelotte de tous ses membres.
Sam: August, vacation on the road.
Sam: September, fall of amber colors.
Sam: October, nature is sober.
Sam: November, put on your dressing gown.
Sam: December, all your members shiver. Here you go, all the months of the year. Yahoo!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sam: So, we always talk about holidays for workers, but how about for students?
Male: Well, French students are very lucky because they have a lot of holidays, don’t they, Céline?
Celine: Yes! Students have five holidays a year. Vacances de Toussaint.
Sam: All Saints Day.
Male: Vacances de Noël.
Sam: Christmas vacation.
Celine: Vacances d’hiver.
Sam: Winter vacation.
Male: Vacances de printemps.
Sam: Spring vacation.
Celine: Et vacances d’été.
Sam: And summer vacation.
Male: Which is my favorite.
Celine: Yes. I love it, too. Usually I go to the beach.
Sam: Do you have summer homework?
Male: Even if I do, for example, I wouldn’t do any of it during the winter…on some holidays.
Celine: Oh, this is a bad, bad example.
Sam: Oh, no.
Celine: Don’t listen to him. You know, France is divided in three zones: A, B, and C, and holidays are different for winter and spring.
Sam: Oh, I guess you can’t have all of the country on vacation at the same time, right?
Celine: Yes.
Male: And usually, the roads are very, very busy in France. You should book your tickets in advance if you want to go somewhere and very busy.
Celine: Yes.
Sam: Sounds like it’s really crowded.
Celine: Yes, it is.
Sam: That can’t be fun, right?
Celine: Holidays are always fun, Sam.
Sam: Even if the roads are crowded?
Celine: Even if the roads are crowded.
Sam: Oh, I understand.
VOCAB LIST
Sam: Now, let’s take at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is…
Male: Vacances [natural native speed].
Sam: Vacation.
Male: Vacances [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Vacances [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Celine: Continuer [natural native speed].
Sam: To go on, to continue.
Celine: Continuer [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Continuer [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Male: Automne [natural native speed].
Sam: Autumn or fall.
Male: Automne [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Automne [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Celine: Routes [natural native speed].
Sam: Roads.
Celine: Routes [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Routes [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Celine: Ambre [natural native speed].
Sam: Amber.
Celine: Ambre [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Ambre [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Celine: Couleur [natural native speed].
Sam: Colors.
Celine: Couleur [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Couleur [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Male: Nature [natural native speed].
Sam: Nature.
Male: Nature [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Nature [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Celine: Mettre [natural native speed].
Sam: To put.
Celine: Mettre [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Mettre [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Celine: Membre [natural native speed].
Sam: Member or limb.
Celine: Membre [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Membre [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Celine: Robe de chambre [natural native speed].
Sam: A nightgown.
Celine: Robe de chambre [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Robe de chambre [natural native speed].
Sam: Next…
Male: Mois [natural native speed]
Sam: Month.
Male: Mois [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Mois [natural native speed].
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Sam: Now let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Celine: Yes. First, we have the word “automne.”
Sam: Autumn or fall.
Male: Yes. After “été” or summer appearing in previous lesson, automne in France is beautiful with maple leaves, but it is also means la fin des vacances, which is sad.
Sam: The end of the holidays?
Celine: Yes.
Sam: Oh, no! What is the season after “automne”?
Celine: L'hiver et le printemps.
Sam: Winter and spring?
Male: L'hiver is the time to go skiing for French people!
Sam: Where do they go?
Celine: Either in the Alps shared by Switzerland, Austria and Italy.
Male: But some of them go to the Pyrénées the border limit with Spain.
Sam: How do say I’m on vacation in French?
Male: Je suis en vacances !
Celine: Les vacances c’est la santé.
Sam: Holidays are healthy.
Male: Well Céline, this is not the real sentence. The real one is “le travail c’est la santé”, which is…
Sam: Work is healthy.
Celine: Oh, Alex! Don’t be so rigid!
Alex: I’m sorry. You are rigid today because you have a neck pain, right?
Celine: Anyway, next word is “couleurs”.
Sam: Colours.
Alex: Céline, quelle est ta couleur preferee?
Sam: “What’s your favourite colour?”
Celine: J'aime le noir et le bleu.
Sam: “I like black and blue.”
Alex: Et moi j’aime les couleurs de la nature.
Sam: “You like the colours of nature?
Celine: Ah la nature, mère nature.
Sam: Mother nature. Do French people care about nature and environment?
Alex: Well, it seems like they try. Did you know that in France there is a ecologist political party? They’re called “Les verts” which means….
Sam: “The Greens.”
Alex: Right.
Celine: Yes. Since 1982, it’s a left political party, as well we have some activists in France like José Bové, but you know Sam in France we say that talking about politics leads to arguments.
Sam: Okay!

Lesson focus

Sam: So why don’t we look at some grammar?
Alex: I think that’s a fantastic idea! C’est une idée fantastique!
Sam: Okay!
Alex: Today's grammar point is about “tout.” Tout means whole, any, every, or very depending on the context.
Celine: It can be an adverb, and adjective and or a pronoun.
Alex: Tout is an adverb when it precedes an adjective and in that case it is always invariable as in “vous êtes tout bronzés”
Sam: “You are completely tanned.”
Celine: Or “vous êtes tout propres.”
Sam: “You are completely clean.”
Celine: The exception is with the feminine form. If tout precedes an adjective, it agrees with the subject as in “elle est toute bronzée”
Sam: “She is completely tanned.”
Alex: “Elles sont toutes propres.”
Sam: “They, as in the ladies, are completely clean.”
Alex: Now let’s see “tout” as an adjective. We saw in our dialogue “tous les mois de l'année”.
Sam: “All the months of the year.”
Alex: Well, here it is easy. “Tout” agrees with the gender and the number. Tout is an adjective if it precedes a determinant as in “tous les garçons.”
Sam: “All the boys.” “Tous” ends with s instead of T because it’s in the plural form.
Celine: Yes. Also, as in “toutes les filles”
Sam: “All the girls.” Here, it’s in the feminine plural, so we need to add an E and the S after the last T.
Celine: “Tout” is an adjective when it precedes a noun as in “en tout état de cause, je vous appellerai.”
Sam: “In any case, I’ll call you.”
Alex: “Tout” is an adjective when it precedes a pronoun as in, “j'aime tous ceux qui m'aiment.”
Sam: “I love everybody who loves me.”
Celine: Yes. And lastly, “tout” as a singular pronoun is invariable as in, “tout est vendu.”
Sam: “Everything got sold.”
Alex: “Tous” and “toutes” as plural pronouns as in “tous arrivent!”
Sam: “Everybody is coming!” Ouh! That was a real grammar point!
Celine: Sam! Also, pay attention. Don’t confuse “tout” as a pronoun or adjective as in “les DVD sont tout neufs.”
Sam: “DVDs are completely new!”
Celine: “Les DVD sont tous neufs!”
Sam: “All the DVDs are new!” Hey, those two sentences sound alike to me!
Celine: Non, non, non, Sam. Didn’t you hear the S in “les DVD sont tous neufs!”
Sam: Ah, okay.
Celine: “Les DVD sont tout neufs!”
Sam: Oh, I understand now.
Celine: Yes. It’s tricky. That’s why you have to pronounce the S.
Sam: Without the S, the sentence is a little bit different. So listeners, be careful.
Alex: Well, it changes the meaning, actually.
Sam: Okay. So let’s just recap those. Alex, why don’t you help me?
Alex: Sure, Sam. Alors, “Les DVD sont tout neufs”, which means…
Sam: “The DVDs are completely new.”
Alex: Right. “Les DVD sont tous neufs!”
Sam: “All the DVDs are new.”
Alex: Right, you got it.
Sam: Oh, great. I’m picking it up little by little, and I’m sure our listeners are too, right?
Alex: Voilà!
Sam: Of course! I think that’s a good place to wrap up for today, don’t you?
Alex: Voilà!

Outro

Sam: So until the next time! But don’t forget, have a look at the PDF and FrenchPod101.com. Leave us a question, comment, or any feedback. Until the next time.
Celine: Au revoir!
Alex: A la prochaine, au revoir!
Sam: Bye-bye.

Grammar

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Which month is the one you wait for the most? For the French it is May, the month when people work the least and enjoy their free time the most with.

In 2008, May 1st is Labor Day /  Ascension Day (Thursday, 40 days after Easter), May 8th is End of World War II VE Day, and May 12th is Whit Monday (Monday after Pentecost).