Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hi everyone! This is Lower Beginner Season 2 Lesson 18, Leave Your Name and Your Number, and I'll Get Back to You in France! I’m Brandon!
Yasmine: Bonjour. I'm Yasmine.
Brandon: Yasmine, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Yasmine: In this lesson you’ll learn how to understand a phone message.
Brandon: This conversation takes place in the street.
Yasmine: This conversation is between Elsa and Bruno.
Brandon: The speakers are friends, so they will be using informal French. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(sonnerie)
Elsa : Vous êtes sur le portable d'Elsa. Merci de me laisser un message.
Bruno : Salut ! C'est Bruno. Rappelle-moi quand tu peux. Mon numéro est le 06 76 98 81 02. A bientôt !
Brandon: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
(sonnerie)
Elsa : Vous êtes sur le portable d'Elsa. Merci de me laisser un message.
Bruno : Salut ! C'est Bruno. Rappelle-moi quand tu peux. Mon numéro est le 06 76 98 81 02. A bientôt !
Brandon: Listen to the conversation with English translation.
(sonnerie)
(ring, ring)
Elsa : Vous êtes sur le portable d'Elsa. Merci de me laisser un message.
Elsa: You have reached Elsa. Please leave a message.
Bruno : Salut ! C'est Bruno. Rappelle-moi quand tu peux. Mon numéro est le 06 76 98 81 02. A bientôt !
Bruno: Hi! It's Bruno. Call me back when you can. My number is 06 76 98 81 02. Talk to you soon.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: Yasmine, how do you leave a voice or text message in French?
Yasmine: When you leave a message you have to say your name and why you called.
Brandon: Ah, it’s Just like other countries, you need to leave your number, so speak clearly and slowly. If the recipient doesn’t know you, you’ll also want to leave your full name and the reason why you called.
Yasmine: So when I leave a voicemail I say Bonjour “hello”, my name, why I called, something like rappelez-moi s'il vous plaît, "please call me back", and Au revoir “Goodbye”.
Brandon: With text messages or sms, it's the same thing. But if texting a number you don’t know you should introduce yourself. Any other important rules?
Yasmine: .Yes, don’t forget to write greetings at the end of the text!
Brandon: Thats all solid advice. Okay, let’s move onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word is..
Yasmine: être [natural native speed]
Brandon: “to be”
Yasmine: être [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: être [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: sonnerie [natural native speed]
Brandon: “alarm”
Yasmine: sonnerie [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: sonnerie [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: portable [natural native speed]
Brandon: “mobile” “cell phone”
Yasmine: portable [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: portable [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: message [natural native speed]
Brandon: “message”
Yasmine: message [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: message [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: rappeler [natural native speed]
Brandon: “to call back”
Yasmine: rappeler [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: rappeler [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: pouvoir [natural native speed]
Brandon: “can”
Yasmine: pouvoir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: pouvoir [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have..
Yasmine: numéro [natural native speed]
Brandon: “number”
Yasmine: numéro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: numéro [natural native speed]
Brandon: The last word is..
Yasmine: bientôt [natural native speed]
Brandon: “soon”
Yasmine: bientôt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Yasmine: bientôt [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Yasmine: sonnerie
Brandon: meaning “bell,” or “alarm."
Yasmine: Sonnerie is a feminine noun, and it's related to the verb sonner .
Brandon: That means "to ring."
Yasmine: Sonner is used in many idiomatic expressions, like sonner occupé.
Brandon: That means “to be busy” when you’re talking about a phone line.
This verb is also used to talk about the sound of a phone, alarm clock, school clock, and other things that tend to ring. But if we’re talking about noises designed to prevent crime or disaster it’s a different word, right?
Yasmine: Right. You should use the word alarme.
Brandon: Okay, what’s the next expression?
Yasmine: rappelle moi
Brandon: "call me back"
Yasmine: Rappelle comes from the verb rappeler meaning to call back, to remind. Moi is a pronoun meaning me.
Brandon: This expression has two meanings. It may mean "call me back (with a phone)” or “help me to remember something.”
Yasmine: That’s right. For example, you can say Rappelle moi ce soir d'acheter du pain.
Brandon: "Remind me tonight to buy some bread." How would we say"call me?"
Yasmine: You have to say appelle moi, using the verb appeler.
Brandon: Okay, what’s the next one?
Yasmine: Next we have.. a bientôt
Brandon: It means "see you soon." It’s a really common expression in France.
Yasmine: If you’ll be meeting someone again soon, use À bientôt when parting ways.
Brandon: But, If you’ll be seeing the person the following day you need to say "see you tomorrow."
Yasmine: In French, that’s a demain. If you don't know when you’ll see the person again just say au revoir.
Brandon: It’s the only formal way to say good-bye. What if you’re talking to a friend and want to be casual?
Yasmine: You can say Salut. Also, you can use bientôt as an adverb.
Brandon: It can be used by itself to mean “soon.”
Yasmine: For example, you can say Nous partirons bientôt en vacances,
Brandon: meaning "We'll be going on holiday soon." Listeners for more information on the words covered in this lesson check the lesson notes, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn phrases you can use when leaving a voice message or talking on the phone. Here are the expressions that you can use for leaving a message.
Yasmine: The first one is Allô?
Brandon: Everyone answers the phone with this expression in France, right?
Yasmine: That’s right. We say allô and not bonjour or bonsoir when answering a phone.
Brandon: The other two greetings open up conversation, while allô is more like asking "is someone there?"
Yasmine: You can say bonjour or bonsoir after you say allô.
Brandon: Listeners, note that when you’re calling a person who you don’t know well, you may want to say your last name or full name.
Yasmine: For example "allô ici Marc Dupuis," or "Bonjour, ici Dupuis."
Brandon: "Hello, I'm Marc Dupuis" or "Hello, Dupuis calling." Okay, what’s the next expression?
Yasmine: Next we have.. Rappelle-moi quand tu peux.
Brandon: meaning "call me back when you can , as soon as possible.”
Yasmine: You can also say Rappelle-moi ce soir/demain,
Brandon: meaning "call me back tonight/tomorrow,"
Yasmine: or Rappelle moi après 17 heures,
Brandon: meaning "call me back after five p.m." What if I want to leave my number?
Yasmine: You can say Mon numéro est le then your number.
Brandon: For example, if you want to say “My number is
06 12 13 14 15.”..
Yasmine: You can say Mon numéro est le zéro-six, douze, treize, quatorze, quinze.
Brandon: Note that in France, a cellphone number has 10 digits and starts with 06, or sometimes 07. Every time you have 0 plus some other number you have to say them separately, but the other numbers are always said together two by two, like 15 not 1-5. And the next expression is..?
Yasmine: A bientôt!
Brandon: It can be used as a set phrase to end the conversation in place of "good bye" or "see you."

Outro

Brandon: Okay, that’s it for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone. See you next time!
Yasmine: À bientôt!

3 Comments

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FrenchPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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How do you feel about making a phone call in French?

FrenchPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 6:55 pm
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Bonjour Evelyne !

Merci pour votre question !

Si le moi est masculin, on écrit rappelé, s'il est féminin (c'est le cas ici) on écrit rappelée.

Je suis un homme : il ou elle m'a rappelé.

Je suis une femme : il ou elle m'a rappelée.


Est-ce plus clair ?

Marie Alice

Team FrenchPod101.com

Evelyne Huang
Thursday at 7:55 am
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Bonjour!


In the lesson note, there is a sentence "Le bel homme que j'ai rencontré ce week-end ne m'a toujours pas rappelée. Pourquoi c'est rappelée mais pas rappelé? Merci de votre réponse!